News

Last updated: 22 july, 2009 - 12:41 GMT

Longest eclipse passes across Asia

The solar eclipse is seen on July 22, 2009 near Iwojima Island, Tokyo, Japan

Millions of people across Asia have been plunged into darkness by the longest total solar eclipse of this century.

Hindu devotees take holy dips in the Sangam, the confluence of the Rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Sarawati, during the solar eclipse in Allahabad, India, Wednesday, July 22, 2009

Many Indians believe the solar eclipse is a harbinger of disharmony

The shadow cast as the moon obscured the sun was observed across parts of India, China and Japan.

Some places experienced the eclipse for more than 6½ minutes.

Scientists say it will be more than a hundred years before there is such a long eclipse again.

The BBC's Sanjoy Majumder went on a special flight above India to view it.

To play this content JavaScript must be turned on and the latest Flash player installed.

Play in either Real OR Windows Media players


The eclipse passed across highly populated areas, although many cities experienced the darkness of the total eclipse under cloudy skies.

People in the city of Anji in China were lucky enough to get a clear view. Astronomer Pete Lawrence was there.

To play this content JavaScript must be turned on and the latest Flash player installed.

Play in either Real OR Windows Media players

First broadcast 22 July 2009

Related BBC Links

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.