Crepuscular rays light up the dawn sky

10/04/19

Some lovely examples of crepuscular rays were photographed by Weather Watchers on Wednesday morning.

Crepuscular rays are beams of sunlight which pass through gaps in the clouds. Particles in the air such as dust and smoke make the rays more visible.

The sunbeams appear to fan outwards but are actually near parallel. They can be seen during sunrise and sunset as this is when the contrast between light and dark is most obvious; the word crepuscular comes from the Latin 'crepusculum' meaning twilight.

Orange beams of sunlight from cloud over the sea
Image caption Alastair photographed amber beams peeking through the clouds in Hinderwell, North Yorkshire
Rays of sunlight through cloud
Image caption Jen captured the scene from North Walsham, looking towards Happisburgh Lighthouse and Church
Beams of sunlight through cloud
Image caption Bands of white light in Histon, Cambridgeshire, photographed by Geoff
Beams of sunlight through cloud
Image caption Morning light fans out over Conisbrough in Doncaster. Photo by Deb
Sun beams over water
Image caption Seagull captured a peaceful view over Kilkeel, County Down
Sun beams through cloud
Image caption Thanks to Mark for posting this shot, taken in Church Broughton, Derbyshire
Sun beams through cloud
Image caption It was an ethereal start to the day in Diseworth, Leicestershire. Photo by appegio