The Happy Prince. 2: The Prince's messenger

A second dance session based on the famous story by Oscar Wilde.

2. The Prince's messenger

Diane Louise Jordan has a second dance session based on the famous story The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde. In the second session the Swallow travels far and wide across the city carrying out the Prince's instruction to help others.

Resources

Teacher's Notes
document

Lesson summary

Warm-up: Clap, tap or stamp out different rhythms – using single and double time; on the spot, and then travelling.

Sequence 1: Egyptian dreams. ‘I am waited for in Egypt,’ said the Swallow. ‘My friends are flying up and down the Nile, and talking to the large lotus-flowers.’ Partners take turns to follow-the-leader; travelling with quick, agile steps, stretching high and bending low along their own imaginary river Nile pathway, in the heat of the Egyptian sunshine.

Sequence 2: The sad seamstress. Start with small, careful, introspective movements; moving your fingers and hands as if pulling a needle and thread through a piece of embroidery. Gradually enlarge and exaggerate these movements; stretching your hands smoothly and fluidly out in different directions and then back in towards your body.

Sequence 3: The Little Swallow. Clap, tap or stamp out a rhythmic pecking pattern to remove the ruby from the Prince’s sword-hilt. Then travel through the spaces with small, light steps; twisting and turning like the agile swallow.

Sequence 4: The cold, hungry writer. Trace large, free-flowing letter shapes in the air with your hands, and on the floor with your feet. Gradually, make the movements smaller and slower as if your body is getting colder and colder until you are no longer able to move.

Sequence 5: The Little Swallow. Clap, tap or stamp out a rhythmic pecking pattern to remove the Prince’s sapphire eye. Then travel through the spaces with small, light steps; twisting and turning like the agile swallow.

Cool down: Slowly trace large, free-flowing letter shapes in the air and on the floor. Lead the movement with different parts of your body – your hand, foot, knee, shoulder or head – and let the rest of your body follow.

Related units of KS1 Dance: Time to Move

The King's new clothes
collection
The Brave Tin Soldier
collection
Ten Pieces - The Firebird
collection