Growth Mindsets

A collection of clips that help unlock growth mindset ideas for pupils and teachers using a cast of animated characters who explore the differences between fixed and growth mindsets.

These clips are suitable for teaching PSHE and Modern Studies at KS2 and 2nd Level.

How to develop a positive mindset

In this animation, Lucas and Meesha show us the difference - and explain that anyone can develop a growth mindset.

Meesha and Lucas are in a maths lesson. Meesha is happy to take on the challenges set by the teacher, but Lucas is more reluctant. Meesha has a growth mindset. She believes intelligence, talent and ability are open to change. So she believes she can get better at maths. This means she tries, puts in effort and works hard to master the learning. Lucas has a fixed mindset. He doesn't believe he can get better at maths. He thinks you're either good at maths or your not. And he is definitely not good at maths.

Through the clip, we see Tom's mindset start to change. He moves from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. He starts to realise that mistakes can be good. In fact, they can be great! And, you can learn lots by having a go, seeing what happens and viewing your mistakes in a positive light.

Teacher Notes

This could be used as an introduction to growth mindsets and a fantastic tool for helping learners reflect on how they think about learning and their own potential to develop.

How to develop a positive mindset

In this animation, Lucas and Meesha show us the difference - and explain that anyone can develop a growth mindset.

Meesha and Lucas are in a maths lesson. Meesha is happy to take on the challenges set by the teacher, but Lucas is more reluctant. Meesha has a growth mindset. She believes intelligence, talent and ability are open to change. So she believes she can get better at maths. This means she tries, puts in effort and works hard to master the learning. Lucas has a fixed mindset. He doesn't believe he can get better at maths. He thinks you're either good at maths or your not. And he is definitely not good at maths.

Through the clip, we see Tom's mindset start to change. He moves from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. He starts to realise that mistakes can be good. In fact, they can be great! And, you can learn lots by having a go, seeing what happens and viewing your mistakes in a positive light.

Teacher Notes

This could be used as an introduction to growth mindsets and a fantastic tool for helping learners reflect on how they think about learning and their own potential to develop.

How your mindset can affect your approach to challenges

An animation where two students, Tom and Meesha, demonstrate how a growth mindset can help you to embrace challenges - and how anyone can change their mindset.

A school talent show is in the offing. Tom and Meesha are both going to enter. Tom has a growth mindset, while Meesha has a fixed mindset. Tom wants to challenge himself. Meesha wants to avoid a challenge. She just wants to do something she's done before, that she knows is safe.

Teacher Notes

This could be used to help pupils understand the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset. Pupils could think about and reflect on their own mindsets and the influence these have on the decisions they make in the classroom.

You could also use it to help learners think critically about how they view challenges and why it is better to embrace challenges than to ignore them.