Science / Design & Technology KS2: What makes a supersonic car move?

The Bloodhound SSC is a supersonic car, which aims to break the land speed record by travelling over 1000 mph.

The young investigators find out about jet engines and Bloodhound's main source of thrust - a rocket.

They meet a rocket scientist and learn about the forces acting on a vehicle.

They discover that fuel needs oxygen to burn, but Bloodhound's rocket will have HTP (high-test peroxide) pumped into its rubber fuel - this burns instantly without needing a match.

This clip is from the series The Bloodhound Adventure.

Teacher Notes

After watching the clip, children could be asked to think about the forces involved in propelling the car forward and carry out a test with their own mini rockets.

Using Alka Seltzer tablets and film canisters, children can mix different liquids to try and gain the ultimate rocket fuel to make their rocket propel itself the highest.

Children could be asked to think about what would make the rocket go higher, like considering the amount of gas produced but also the time taken for the gas to be produced. This would make a good link with the instantaneous fuel burned in the supersonic car.

Curriculum Notes

This clip will be relevant for teaching Science or Design and Technology at Key Stage 2 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and Level 2 in Scotland.

More from The Bloodhound Adventure

Experimenting with balloon-powered cars
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Experimenting with reaction times
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What's Bloodhound like to drive?
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Experimenting propulsion with water rockets
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Harnessing air resistance with parachutes
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How air resistance slows down vehicles
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Investigating air and water resistance
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Investigating friction
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Is the Bloodhound SSC a car, a boat or a plane?
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What impact does air resistance and density have on travelling fast?
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Why doesn't Bloodhound have tyres?
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