Science / Design & Technology KS2: What's Bloodhound like to drive?

A team of children investigate why Bloodhound SSC will be driven by RAF Fighter pilot Andy Green, rather than a racing car driver, and what he will experience.

They use a simulator to try flying an RAF Phantom, with all its complex control.

Andy Green takes them on a flight on a light aircraft, so they can experience G-force on a loop the loop.

They also go on a high-speed fairground ride, which is another place to experience G-force.

They conclude that the forces on Andy will be much stronger than in a normal car, much more like flying a plane.

This clip is from the series The Bloodhound Adventure

Teacher Notes

When investigating forces in action, pupils could make stomp rockets and paper aeroplanes to explore which shape is the most streamlined, reducing air resistance.

Measuring how fast different objects fall to the ground will also help children to investigate the force of gravity and the opposing force of air resistance.

Visiting the local park or using images of playgrounds can help children to identify the different forces exerted when playing on different equipment.

Curriculum Notes

This clip will be relevant for teaching Science or Design and Technology at Key Stage 2 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and Level 2 in Scotland.

More from The Bloodhound Adventure

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Experimenting with reaction times
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Experimenting propulsion with water rockets
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Harnessing air resistance with parachutes
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How air resistance slows down vehicles
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Investigating air and water resistance
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Investigating friction
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Is the Bloodhound SSC a car, a boat or a plane?
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What impact does air resistance and density have on travelling fast?
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Why doesn't Bloodhound have tyres?
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What makes a supersonic car move?
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