Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 1/6): The world's biggest skydive

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On Sunday 14 October 2012, Felix Baumgartner set the record for the fastest and highest skydive in history.

To do this Felix and his team of scientists, engineers and doctors had to push the boundaries of science to the very limit; in order to get him safely through the sound barrier and into the record books.

Along the way, Felix flew the largest manned balloon ever and helped to develop a new generation space suit.

This clip gives an overview of the main challenges the team faced from the outset.

It also introduces the history behind the record set by Colonel Joe Kittinger in 1960, which they were trying to break.

This is from the series: The Science of Space Dive - Learning Zone

Teacher Notes

This clip could be used to show students how an elite team, from various disciplines across science and engineering, worked together to achieve a common goal.

Curriculum Notes

This clip is relevant to teaching Science and Physics at KS3 and KS4 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and at 3rd and 4th Level in Scotland.

More from the series: The Science of Space Dive

Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 2/6) - The balloon
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Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 3/6) - The pressure suit and space capsule
video
Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 4/6) - The dangers of altitude
video
Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 5/6) - The physics of free-fall
video
Physics KS3 / GCSE: The Science of Space Dive (pt 6/6) - Free-falling through the sound barrier
video