History GCSE / National 5: Treating Indian soldiers at Brighton Pavilion in WW1

In 1914, the former royal palace at Brighton Pavilion became a hospital to treat injured soldiers from the Indian Army.

Soldiers across the British Empire were asked to enlist, with large numbers coming from India.

A hospital was prepared for injured Indian Army soldiers in the Brighton Pavilion, once a royal palace built to reflect Indian architecture.

Jeremy Paxman tells us the religious differences of Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs were respected, and the soldiers were treated by British nurses, which would not have been allowed in India at the time.

Teacher Notes

In pairs pupils write letters to reflect the new perspectives experienced by British host medical staff and Indian patients, the target being empathy to show the novelty for both parties in the context of 1914.

Curriculum Notes

This clip will be relevant for teaching History. This topic appears in at KS3 in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and OCR, Edexcel, AQA and WJEC/Eduqas GCSE/KS4 in England and Wales and CCEA GCSE in Northern Ireland.

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