Judy Murray: Boris Becker comments caused her to 'really struggle'

Judy Murray says those who described her as a "pushy mum" did not know her
Judy Murray says those who described her as a "pushy mum" did not know her

Judy Murray "really struggled" and did not go out for three days after Boris Becker said son Andy should "ditch" her following Australian Open final defeat.

Andy Murray reached four Grand Slam finals before winning the US Open in 2012 and Wimbledon in 2013 and 2016.

During a discussion about mental health on BBC Scotland's Fair Play podcast, Judy Murray cited commentsexternal-link by Becker in February 2011.

"I'm not sure I'll ever forgive Boris Becker for that," she said.

"He's never apologised. I don't think he would ever understand what he made me feel like.

"I called him out on it a couple of years later. I thought it was right to let him know how much damage he had caused by doing something like that."

Murray explained how she became aware of a piece by Becker following her youngest son's 2011 Melbourne loss to Novak Djokovic.

She noticed the headline on a billboard outside a newsagents while out shopping.

"I just saw this on the street outside where I live," she recalled. "I went home, I didn't go out for about three days and I really struggled with that.

"Boris Becker is such a huge figure in tennis and I thought, 'people will think he knows what he's talking about, they're going to think that's my fault'. And actually, I hardly ever went to the tournaments.

"Most players have their parents or their families with them at the Grand Slams. Those are the events where you need the most emotional support. It's incredibly important."

Murray, whose other son Jamie has seven Grand Slam doubles titles, says she has had to rely on "common sense" when dealing with being portrayed as "pushy".

"I came in for an awful lot of criticism simply for being a competitive woman who was pumping her fist watching her kid play in the same way that I had done all of his tennis playing life," she added.

"I was being singled out by people who had never met me, never knew what we'd been through. It made me feel like there was something wrong with being a competitive mum, whereas if I'd been a competitive dad, you'd be applauded."

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