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Summary

  1. Great Britain's Kyle Evans, Quillan Isidore and Kye Whyte compete in the men's elite event
  2. UCI World Cup leader Niek Kimmann (Ned) and defending World Champion Corben Sharrah (US) also feature
  3. Reigning world junior champion Beth Shriever (GB) competes in women's elite race
  4. Men's and women's elite races concludes championships
  5. Use play icon to watch coverage

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

  1. BBC Coverage

    BBC Sport will be broadcasting all the action from the final day of the BMX World Championships from Baku.

    Saturday, 9 June

    17:30-20:40 BST: BMX World Championships - BBC Red Button and online

  2. Who to watch

    After winning the Junior Women's event at last year's World Championships in the US, Great Britain's Beth Shriever will be hoping to replicate her success from 12 months ago in the elite competition.

    Shriever heads into Baku in good form, having secured her first World Cup victory in Zolder last month but will have to compete against the likes of the USA's defending World Champion Alise Willoughby.

    The Brit is joined by GB senior squad programme riders Kyle Evans, Quillan Isidore and Kye Whyte, who will all compete in the Men's Elite event.

    Niek Kimmann is one of the current favourites in that competition, with the Dutch rider currently leading the UCI World Cup, alongside defending World Champion Corben Sharrah.

    Alise Willoughby
  3. What are the BMX World Championships?

    The UCI BMX World Championships stand alongside the BMX Supercross World Cup as the sport's premier competition.

    Unlike the World Cup, which is an international racing series held at several locations throughout the year, the World Championships are held just once a year, with the winner of each event crowned BMX Cycling World Champion.

    The event sees riders compete in four main categories, with Elite and Junior races for both men and women.

    BMX World Championships, Baku
  4. Get Inspired: How to get into BMX Cycling

    Get Inspired

    #GetInspired

    BMX has come along way from the skate parks and dirt roads it was first popularised in Britain in the 1980s, making its debut as an Olympic sport at Beijing in 2008.

    The effort of riding a BMX bike at speed not only helps aid weight loss but increases endurance, promotes agility, develops physical coordination and builds muscle strength.

    Whether practising to compete in races or perform tricks, BMX boosts self-discipline, motivation, self-esteem and confidence, while training sessions are an excellent way to develop communication skills and learn to work effectively with other people.

    There are currently more than 50 dedicated BMX tracks throughout the UK. Find your local club by using British Cycling's club finder.

    Training days and taster schemes are run for people of all ages and abilities throughout the year. Visit the British Cycling, Cycling Ireland, Scottish Cycling and Welsh Cycling websites for more information.

    Video content

    Video caption: BMX explained