Football kits: Iconic strips - from Moore to Maradona

Diego Maradona, Eric Cantona and Bobby Moore
To mark Saturday's Football Focus show coming from the National Football Museum in Manchester, the BBC is showcasing some of the game's greatest - and not so greatest - kits. Get involved with @BBCSport on Twitter by uploading your photos using #myfirstfootballkit
Brazil's Rivelino in 1970
The National Football Museum is staging a football and fashion exhibition which illustrates changing styles. Brazil's first strip was white with a blue collar, but the colours were changed after a disappointing World Cup in 1950
Real Madrid 1971
The beauty of Real Madrid's all-white kit is its simplicity. Former Leeds United manager Don Revie reportedly adopted the look in 1961 in the hope that it would improve his team's playing style
Manchester City's Francis Lee in 1972
Manchester City introduced a new club badge in 1965, based on the central part of the City of Manchester's coat of arms. Retro football shirts have enjoyed a revival in recent years, including the Manchester City strip of 1972-73, as seen here on Francis Lee
The Netherlands's Johan Cruyff 1974
The Netherlands famously play in orange. This originates from the coat of arms of the Dutch founding father, William of Orange-Nassau, seen here on Dutch midfield master Johan Cruyff in 1974
Crystal Palace 1980
Crystal Palace originally played in claret and blue. In 1973, Palace manager Malcolm Allison changed the club colours to red and blue in an attempt to modernise their look, which took its most memorable form in the 1980-81 'sash' kit
Juventus's Michel Platini in 1980
Playing for Juventus in 1903, Englishman John Savage helped the club replace their original pink shirts. It has been reported that a friend of Savage's, a Notts County supporter, shipped black and white striped shirts to Turin. Juve have worn the shirts ever since, as seen here on Michel Platini in 1980
England Football Team 1980
The English national squad, featuring players such as Glenn Hoddle, Trevor Brooking, Kevin Keegan and Ray Wilkins, wore this kit during the 1980 European Championship in Italy. The team failed to make it out of the group stage of the competition under Ron Greenwood's management
Argentina's Diego Maradona in 1986
What makes a football shirt great - the design or the players who wore it? Diego Maradona helped his team to victory at the 1986 World Cup in Argentina's classic sky blue and white stripes
Arsenal's Ian Wright 1992-93
The early '90s brought a whole new league of football fashion. Arsenal were among the clubs that began to move away from conventional shirt designs in 1991
Hull City 1992-93
Hull City took their nickname literally with the 1992-93 'Tiger' kit, as seen here on David Norton. No actual tigers were harmed in the making of this colourful strip
World Cup USA 1994
The hosts of the 1994 USA World Cup sported one of the most interesting kits of the tournament, seen here on defender Alexi Lalas
Mexico's Jorge Campos 1994 World Cup
The 1994 World Cup was a colourful affair. Mexico's goalkeeper Jorge Campos gained notoriety during the competition for his outlandish strip and playing style
Arsenal's Thierry Henry 2006
In 2005-06 Arsenal celebrated their final season at Highbury by reverting to their original colours. The Gunners wore their burgundy shirt for one year before switching back to red and white. Sparta Prague are still playing in Arsenal's original colours, after being inspired by the north Londoners in 1906
Mark Bosnich Aston Villa 1992-1999
It was easy to see Aston Villa goalkeeper Mark Bosnich coming during the 1994-95 season
French National Team 2011
Nike’s 2011 Vive Le Football Libre campaign claimed to bring a "new philosophy" to the French national team. Les Bleus's away kit took inspiration from nautical Breton-style shirts
David Seaman, England and Arsenal 1990-2003
Goalkeepers often get the short straw when it comes to kits, as proved by David Seaman during the 1994-95 season for Arsenal
Dalian Atkinson Aston Villa 1991-1995
We have already had one kit from Aston Villa but we could not let this one slip through the net, as worn by former striker Dalian Atkinson during the 1994-95 season
Darren Eadie Norwich City 1993-1999
When your home colours are yellow and green there is not too much need for anything else, but Norwich's home kit from 1992-94 took it one step too far as proved by Darren Eadie
Brian Tinnion (left) scored the only goal in the 1-0 replay at Anfield
When Bristol City beat Liverpool in an FA Cup reply at Anfield in 1994 they made sure no one forgot it by dazzling in this lovely purple and green strip
Chelsea's team from the 1994-95 season
The least said about this offering from Chelsea the better. There are horizontal and vertical stripes, a strange pattern and it is grey and orange - need we go on?
Jim Gannon - Stockport County 1990-2000
Stockport County's Jim Gannon wore a succession of garish shirts during the 1990s for the Hatters, but this one was the pick of the bunch, from 1993
Darren Rowbotham - Birmingham City 1992-93
This Birmingham City home shirt, as worn by Darren Rowbotham, failed to see out the 1992-93 season as the club changed it before the end of the campaign - any suggestions why?