Lord's honours boards: Men's and women's ODI performances added

Anya Shrubsole
Anya Shrubsole's six-wicket haul against India in the World Cup final will now be included in the Lord's honours board

Individual performances in women's cricket have been added to new honours boards at Lord's.

The new boards include performances in men's and women's one-day internationals, with centuries and five-wicket hauls listed.

Previously, only performances in Tests were added and there has yet to be a women's Test at the ground.

"This is a landmark moment, with women's cricket now documented," MCC chief executive Guy Lavender said.

The changes, which are part of extensive refurbishments of the dressing rooms, mean England bowler Anya Shrubsole's figures of 6-46 against India in 2017 to win the ICC Women's World Cup, are included.

England's Claire Taylor, Sarah Taylor and Caroline Atkins and Australia's Lisa Keightley are the first women's players to see their names recognised for ODI centuries, while Australia's Cathryn Fitzpatrick and England's Katherine Brunt join Shrubsole in being celebrated for five-wicket hauls.

Claire Taylor also holds the record for the highest ODI score at Lord's - men's or women's - scoring an unbeaten 156 against India in 2006.

bowling figures at Lord's
England players' achievements in ODIs are now featured in the dressing rooms at Lord's

Retired internationals Michael Atherton, Ricky Ponting and Muttiah Muralitharan, who all missed out on Test honours at Lord's, will also have their names on the boards for achievements in ODIs.

Atherton scored a century for England in a one-day match against the West Indies in 1995, Ponting scored 111 for Australia against the same side in 2005 and in 1998 Muralitharan recorded figures of five for 34 for Sri Lanka, ripping through England's top order.

Lavender added: "We are delighted to now be able to recognise the same achievements for one-day internationals as we have done for Test matches for many years.

"There is a huge amount of prestige for players to see their name inscribed in history."

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