BBC R&D

Posted by Richard Wright on , last updated

As mentioned in Ant Miller's post of 4 December, on Monday the 30th of November BBC R&D hosted an invite only Archive Workshop, with presentations from academia and industry. The head of the Archive Research section, John Zubrzycki, sends this report:

archive_workshop_30112009.jpeg Archives are changing to meet the demands of an on-line world. These changes have been enabled by the application of new technology. The first BBC Archives Workshop was held on Monday 30th November at Kingswood Warren to explore these changes and the enabling technologies. There were sixteen presentations from academia, industry and from within the BBC. Presentations covered both technology for archives and the applications of archives, with many of the presentations including on-line demonstrations. Technology presentations included three on the research about various aspects of visual search and image recognition at Oxford, Surrey and Leeds universities, one on the use of fingerprinting to identify video content from St Andrew's, a presentation on quality checking of content, MXF file format and open standards from Amberfin and a presentation on the use of techniques such as video segmentation and audio recognition to identify events in programmes by Metalabs.

Applications of archive content in academic research were described in presentations on the Spoken Word project by Glasgow Caledonian University, EU Screen and Video Active by Royal Holloway, plus the implementation of the BUFVC archive of broadcast content by Cambridge Imaging Systems, who also described their implementation of the on-line Pathé news film archive. A community application on a communication support system for older people with dementia using archive content was presented by Dundee University.

Daniel Teruggi described INA, the French National AV archive and explained the PrestoPRIME EU collaborative project on digital preservation: it is not safe to assume that content is safe once it is digitised! There was a presentation about the BFI's experiences in digitising content and the gems of old programmes and clips waiting to be discovered.

BBC presentations included a description of the Proteus content workflow management system used in radio; important now that archives need to be integrated into such workflows for TV as well as radio. There was a presentation of an R&D project that links the BBC archives archive database, called Infax, with an on-line content store that R&D has developed for storing digital TV broadcasts and browse quality copies of the BBC archive (as the archive is digitised), with the result that programme makers searching the BBC archive database can now see the content is their browsers.

The workshop ended with a look back at the Archives Hackday that took place at the start of November at Kingswood Warren, where BBC computer programmers explored new ideas on the use of archive content.

The workshop was a very busy day, attended by about sixty people from the BBC and other organisation with an interest in archives. It was a good opportunity for people normally busy with their operational work in the archives to see and hear about the new developments and to have a chance to meet and discuss the future of archives with researchers and innovative organisations.

As mentioned in Ant Miller's post of 4 December, on Monday the 30th of November BBC R&D hosted an invite only Archive Workshop, with presentations from academia and industry. The head of the Archive Research section, John Zubrzycki, sends this report:

buildings_kingswood_lge.jpg

Archives are changing to meet the demands of an on-line world. These changes have been enabled by the application of new technology. The first BBC Archives Workshop was held on Monday 30th November at Kingswood Warren to explore these changes and the enabling technologies. There were sixteen presentations from academia, industry and from within the BBC. Presentations covered both technology for archives and the applications of archives, with many of the presentations including on-line demonstrations. Technology presentations included three on the research about various aspects of visual search and image recognition at Oxford, Surrey and Leeds universities, one on the use of fingerprinting to identify video content from St Andrew's, a presentation on quality checking of content, MXF file format and open standards from Amberfin and a presentation on the use of techniques such as video segmentation and audio recognition to identify events in programmes by Metalabs.

Applications of archive content in academic research were described in presentations on the Spoken Word project by Glasgow Caledonian University, EU Screen and Video Active by Royal Holloway, plus the implementation of the BUFVC archive of broadcast content by Cambridge Imaging Systems, who also described their implementation of the on-line Pathé news film archive. A community application on a communication support system for older people with dementia using archive content was presented by Dundee University.

Daniel Teruggi described INA, the French National AV archive and explained the PrestoPRIME EU collaborative project on digital preservation: it is not safe to assume that content is safe once it is digitised! There was a presentation about the BFI's experiences in digitising content and the gems of old programmes and clips waiting to be discovered.

BBC presentations included a description of the Proteus content workflow management system used in radio; important now that archives need to be integrated into such workflows for TV as well as radio. There was a presentation of an R&D project that links the BBC archives archive database, called Infax, with an on-line content store that R&D has developed for storing digital TV broadcasts and browse quality copies of the BBC archive (as the archive is digitised), with the result that programme makers searching the BBC archive database can now see the content is their browsers.

The workshop ended with a look back at the Archives Hackday that took place at the start of November at Kingswood Warren, where BBC computer programmers explored new ideas on the use of archive content.

The workshop was a very busy day, attended by about sixty people from the BBC and other organisation with an interest in archives. It was a good opportunity for people normally busy with their operational work in the archives to see and hear about the new developments and to have a chance to meet and discuss the future of archives with researchers and innovative organisations.