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Handing back Uluru

In 1985 the Australian government returned Uluru, the ancient red monolith formerly known as Ayers Rock, to aboriginal ownership. But not all Australians were pleased.

In 1985 Australia's most famous natural landmark, Uluru, the huge ancient red rock formerly known as Ayers Rock, was handed back to its traditional owners, the indigenous people of that part of central Australia, the Anangu. But as one of the government officials involved in the negotiations for the transfer, former private secretary for aboriginal affairs, Kim Wilson, tells Louise Hidalgo, not everyone in Australia was pleased.

Picture: Uluru, formerly Ayers Rock, in Kata Tjuta National Park, the world's largest monolith and an Aboriginal sacred site (Credit: Jeff Overs/BBC)

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9 minutes

Last on

Fri 29 Nov 2019 04:50GMT

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  • Fri 29 Nov 2019 04:50GMT

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