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When things go wrong, we crave something or someone to blame. It's an emotional response found in nearly every culture. The Why Factor asks: why do we play the blame game?

When things go wrong, we crave something or someone to blame. It’s a strategy which puts people on the defensive, and can create a toxic culture. People remember when they have been blamed for something, and will be quicker to deflect blame themselves. It’s a primitive emotion which can be found in almost every society. In this edition of the Why Factor, Sandra Kanthal asks: why do we play the blame game?

Contributors to this programme include:
Mark Alicke, Psychology Professor, Ohio University
Terri Apter, Psychologist and Author of Passing Judgement: The Power of Praise and Blame in Everyday Life.
Charlie Campbell, Author of Scapegoat: A History of Blaming Other People
Dr Cicely Cunningham, Oncologist and founder of the campaign: Learn Not Blame
Richard Gowthorpe, Criminal Defence Lawyer
Armele Philpotts- relationship and family therapist and member of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy.

Image: Pointing Fingers
Credit: Getty Images

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23 minutes

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Tue 5 Feb 2019 02:32GMT

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