Main content

A New Perspective on Psychedelics

There is a growing body of evidence that psychedelic drugs can be used to treat a variety of medical conditions. Should they be considered for wider use?

LSD, magic mushrooms, mescaline, peyote - just some of the most well known psychedelic drugs. Most of them are illegal around the world. Research into psychedelic medicine was virtually shut down in the West because psychedelics were considered mind-altering substances open to abuse. This perception is changing. There is a growing body of evidence that some psychedelic drugs can be used to treat a variety of medical conditions. There have been clinical trials of psilocybin - the active ingredient in magic mushrooms - for treatment-resistant depression. Just one dose was found to help people with life-threatening cancer face death. James Coomarasamy and a panel of expert guests discuss the evidence that psychedelics have transformative and beneficial properties. Are most authorities right to continue to ban them or should they be considered for wider use - and if so, under what conditions?

Available now

50 minutes

Last on

Sat 25 Aug 2018 11:06GMT

Contributors

Rosalind Watts - Clinical psychologist, Imperial College London

Amanda Feilding - Oxford based psychedelics researcher

Mo Costandi - Freelance science writer

David Nichols - Professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Photo

A healer starting a ceremony with the psychedelic, yage, in La Calera, Colombia by Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Broadcasts

The Real Story Podcast

The Real Story Podcast

Subscribe via your favourite podcast app...

Podcast