Main content

Trolling for Cash

How our urge to seek outrage means big business

Anger and animosity is prevalent online, with some people even seeking it out. It's present on social media of course as well as many online forums. But now outrage has spread to mainstream media outlets and even the advertising industry. So why is it so lucrative?

Bonny Brooks, a writer and researcher at Newcastle University explains who is making money from outrage. Neuroscientist Dr Dean Burnett describes what happens to our brains when we see a comment designed to provoke us. And Curtis Silver, a tech writer for KnowTechie and ForbesTech, gives his thoughts on what we need to do to defend ourselves from this onslaught of outrage.

(Image: Warning sign attached on a fence. Credit: Getty Images)

Available now

18 minutes

Last on

Thu 30 Aug 2018 07:32GMT

Broadcast

How the 2008 crash shaped our world

How the 2008 crash shaped our world

Stories from people involved in the crash and how its effects are still felt today

Business Daily Podcast

Business Daily Podcast

Download every programme.

Podcast