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Episode 2

The group dig deeper to understand how they became big in the first place and turn to look at what society should do about it. They also get to enjoy a dance class, comedy gig and family barbecue.

Obesity is rarely out of the headlines. With levels doubling in the last 20 years and over one in four people classed as living with the condition, it is one of the leading causes of serious health consequences and premature death. This series gets behind the statistics and gives a voice to people who are often discussed, but rarely heard.

In the second episode, the group dig deeper to understand how they became big in the first place and turn to look at what society should do about it. They also get to enjoy a dance class, comedy gig and family barbecue.

Babs and Victoria battle their differing opinions on whether fat bodies can be attractive – with devastating consequences.

Babs reveals her own history of disordered eating and says that for her binge eating feels like a drug addiction. She wants to explore what help she may be able to get. Sarah, the director of charity Obesity UK laments the short-sighted way in which the NHS treats people who struggle with their weight.

The group receive the results of a survey of public attitudes towards people living in larger bodies and are divided over the revelations. 69% of people in the survey think the rise in obesity is becoming too much of a burden on the NHS. For Babs the idea that obesity is a drain on the NHS is a given, but not everyone agrees. The survey also asked if children who are obese should be encouraged to lose weight. 84% of people in the survey said they should. Fat activist Victoria disagrees - she believes encouraging children to lose weight can lead to eating disorders.

The group are visited by geneticist Dr Giles Yeo who reveals the results of their DNA test. He explains how some of them carry genes making them crave fatty foods and that their genes play a role in their current weight. For Jed, there are surprises in his genes that cause him to rethink his own weight journey and question where the burden of personal responsibility lies.

The arrival of two Parliamentarians working on the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on obesity causes friction as the group struggle to agree on what the future should look like for people living in bigger bodies, and some are left questioning whether the fight to end obesity means the eradication of them as people.

It is stand-up comedian Jed's 29th birthday and he celebrates by doing a spot at a local comedy club. But will the rest of the group appreciate his self-deprecating humour as he laughs at his own weight? For plus-size model and influencer David, representation is entirely serious.

10 months left to watch

59 minutes

Last on

Tue 29 Oct 2019 21:00

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Music Played

Timings (where shown) are from the start of the programme in hours and minutes

  • 00:08

    The Black Eyed Peas

    My Humps

  • 00:15

    Agnes Obel

    Stretch Your Eyes

  • 00:45

    Laura Mvula

    Can't Live With The World

  • 00:46

    Laura Mvula

    Can't Live With The World

  • 00:51

    Kyla La Grange

    Cut Your Teeth

  • 00:54

    Klingande

    Jubel

Credits

Role Contributor
Narrator Ewen MacIntosh
Composer Tim Atack
Production Manager Helen Alsop
Producer Clare Johns
Producer Adam Perkins
Producer Emma Pentecost
Producer Alex Scott
Producer Alex Thomas
Series Editor Oliver Manley
Series Producer Charlotte Armstrong
Executive Producer Sara Ramsden
Production Company Love Productions
Editor Claire Tomlinson

Broadcast

What it’s really like to identify as fat?

What it’s really like to identify as fat?

What is it really like to either live with obesity or identify as fat in modern Britain?