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An icicle of moon

The Royal College of Music Symphony Orchestra plays Simon Holt's An icicle of moon, along with works by Mozart and Dvorak.

Georgia Mann presents a concert from the Royal College of Music, London.

Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante for Winds, K297b
Simon Holt: an icicle of moon
Dvorak: Symphony No 8
Royal College of Music Symphony Orchestra
Thomas Zehetmair, conductor

Austrian violinist and conductor Thomas Zehetmair directs the RCM Symphony Orchestra in this varied evening concert. Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante opens the programme, treating us to rich textures and dazzling solo writing. RCM Professor of Composition Simon Holt follows with a work dedicated to the 80th birthday of fellow composer Harrison Birtwistle. An icicle of moon is an evocative piece scored for a small orchestra which takes its name from a line in the García Lorca poem, Romance somnámbulo. Finally, Dvorak's Symphony No 8 closes the programme with its charming Czech melodies and unexpected Slavonic waltz movement.

Photo: © Chris Christodoulou

24 days left to listen

2 hours, 28 minutes

Music Played

  • Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

    Sinfonia concertante in E flat major K.297b

    Orchestra: Royal College of Music Symphony Orchestra. Conductor: Thomas Zehetmair.
  • Simon Holt

    An Icicle of moon for orchestra

    Orchestra: Royal College of Music Symphony Orchestra. Conductor: Thomas Zehetmair.
  • Antonín Dvořák

    Symphony no. 8 in G major Op.88

    Orchestra: Royal College of Music Symphony Orchestra. Conductor: Thomas Zehetmair.
  • Franz Schubert

    Die schoene Mullerin

    Performer: Joseph Middleton. Singer: Ashley Riches.
  • Doreen Carwithen

    Sonatina for cello

    Performer: Andrei Ioniţă. Performer: Lilit Grigoryan.

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