Main content

Rowley Leigh: A Life Through Food

Rowley Leigh, 'godfather' of modern British cooking tells his food story to Dan Saladino. Along the way he cooks the perfect omelette and shares the secrets of cooking great pasta.

Rowley Leigh, to many the "godfather" of modern British cooking tells his story to Dan Saladino. Along the way he cooks the perfect omelette and shares the secrets of great pasta.

After dropping out of university at the end of the 1960s, Rowley Leigh says he was a young and lost soul. Desperate for cash he applied for a job cooking burgers and immediately fell in love with restaurants and kitchens.

It took him to Le Gavroche and an apprenticeship under the Roux brothers. Armed with that classical training and a curiosity for British ingredients and flavours he helped launch the British food renaissance of the 1980s. In Kensington Place he created one of the most talked about dining rooms in British restaurant history.

He is also a writer and so he takes Dan Saladino through some of the recipe highlights of his two decades worth of columns at The Financial Times.

Expect the perfect omelette, some great spaghetti and one of the simplest vegetable dishes you could probably add to your own repertoire.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.

Available now

28 minutes

OMLETTE FINES HERBES

OMLETTE FINES HERBES

At  Le  Cafe  Anglais  we  used  heavy  iron  frying  pans,  which  were  never  washed  but  polished  with  salt  and  stored  with  a  thin  filmof  oil.  At  home  I  resort  to  a  small  non-stick  frying  pan.  One  tip:  although  an  omelette  does  indeed  cook  incredibly  quickly,  many  people  panic  and  try  to  shake  it  and  turn  it  too  soon.  All  this  activity  can  stop  the  omelette  from  cooking.  Itis  also  worth  knowing  that  it  will  not  colour  in  the  early  stages  and  it  is  only  towards  the  end  that  it  is  important  to  turn  and  agitate  the  omelette.

Serves  four  for  a  main  and  six  for  a  starter.

Ingredients:

  • a  few  sprigs  of  parsley,  chervil,  tarragon  and  chives
  • 3  fresh  eggs
  • oil,  for  cooking  10g  (1/4oz) 
  • butter
  • salt  and  black  pepper

 

Method:

Pick  and  wash  the  parsley  leaves  and  then  chop  all  the  herbs:  the  parsley  and  the  chives  should  be  chopped  quite  finely,  while  the  chervil  and  tarragon  should  be  roughly  chopped  so as not to  bruise  them  or  damage  their  flavour.

Thoroughly  whisk  the  eggs  in  a  bowl  with  a  fork  or  whisk  so  that  yolk  and  white  are  completely  integrated.  Season  with  a  small  pinch  of  salt  and  a  little  freshly  ground  black  pepper  and  add  the  herbs.

Heat  the  pan  with  the  merest  film  of  cooking  oil  with  the  suspicion  of  a  heat  haze.  Add  the  butter  and  quickly,  before  it  has  a  chance  to  burn,  pour  in  the  eggs.  Do  nothing  for  30  seconds  apart  from  keeping  the  pan  over  a  high  heat,  and  wait  until  the  eggs  start  to  bubble  up.  At  this  point  scrape  around  the  sides  of  the  pan  with  a  wooden  spoon  or  fork  and  then,  holding  the  pan  slightly  angled  away  from  you  and  pushing  it  in  that  direction,  give  it  a  sharp  jerk  back  towards  you  so  that  the  raw  mixture  at  the  back  is  tossed  back  down  to  the  bottom.  Do  this  two  or  three  times,  making  sure  none  of  the  mixture  is  sticking  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.

When  the  mixture  is  still  soft  and  runny,  hold  the  pan  at  an  angle  away  from  you  and  give  it  a  sharp  knock  on  the  stove  so  that  the  omelette  slips  down  towards  the  edge  of  the  pan.  Roll  the  mixture  from  the  side  nearest  to  you  down  towards  the  opposite  edge  and  then,  inverting  the  pan,  roll  the  omelette  right  out of  the  pan  onto  a  plate.

SPAGHETTI CACIO E PEPE

SPAGHETTI CACIO E PEPE

You  remove  the  spaghetti  from  its  water  after  a  mere  four  or  five  minutes,  when  itis  the  sort  ofal  dente  that  breaks  teeth,  although  it  must  have  softened  enough  to  bend  in  the  pan.  You  then  proceed  to  ladle  in  some  of  its  cooking  water  so  that  a  dish  that  starts  like  a  conventional  plate  of  pasta  is  cooked  like  a  risotto,  albeit  one  that  is  finished  with  nothing  but  waterand  handfuls  of  pepper  and  cheese.  Itis  a  recipe  that  is  well  suited  to  the  non-Italian,  most  of  whom  can  never  manage  the  act  of  faith  of  removing  pasta  from  its  cooking  water  just  before  it  is  ready  and  can  never  resist  the  temptation  to  wait  an  extra  thirty  seconds  and  thus  usually  serve  it  slightly  overcooked.

Serves  four.


Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon  black  peppercorns
  • 100g  (31/2oz)  Pecorino  Romano  cheese
  • 300g  (101/2oz)  spaghetti 
  • Salt
  • olive  oil,  to  serve  (optional)


Method:

Using  a  mortar  and  pestle,  pound  the  peppercorns  to  what  the  French  call  a  mignonette,  in  which  every  peppercorn  is  crushed  but  not  pounded  to  a  fine  consistency. 

Finely  grate  all  the  cheese.

Bring  a  large  pot  of  water  to  the  boil  with  a  small  handful  of  salt.  Add  the  spaghetti,  stir  with  tongs  or  a  long  fork  and  bring  back  to  the  boil  for  just  5  minutes.  Using  tongs,  lift  the  spaghetti  out  into  a  large  saucepan  or  wok.  Add  a  ladleful  of  the  cooking  water  and  continue  to  cook  the  spaghetti,  stirring  with  the  tongs. 

After  a  minute  add a  handful  of  the  cheese  and  a  spoonful  of  the  pepper  and  more  cooking  water:  the  idea  is to  produce  a  creamy emulsion  of  cheese,  pepper,  water  and  the  starch  from  the  pasta  that  clings  to  each  strand  of  spaghetti.  Continue for  2–3  minutes,  alternately  adding  cheese,  pepper  and  cooking  water  until  the  cheese  and  pepper  are  all  used  up  and  the  spaghetti  still  has  that  authentic  ‘bite’.

Serve  the  pasta  immediately.  Some  Romans  allow  a  little  good  olive  oil  to  be  trickled  over  it  before  serving.

ACQUACOTTA

ACQUACOTTA

This is not so much a definitive recipe as an example of aquacotta.

Serves  four.

Ingredients:

  • 1  celery  heart,  quartered  lengthways
  • 3  tablespoons  olive  oil
  • 6  spring  onions,  trimmed 
  • 1  small  head  of  spring  cabbage,  cut  into  thick  ribbons
  • 150g  (51/2oz)  canned  chopped  tomatoes
  • 2  handfuls  of  fresh  peas
  • a  generous  pinch  of  golden  caster  sugar
  • 4  eggs
  • vinegar,  for  cooking  the  eggs  (optional)
  • 4  thick  slices  of  bread,  toasted
  • salt  and  black  pepper 
  • grated  Parmesan  cheese,  to  serve  (optional)

 

Method:

Place  the  celery  in  a  heavy,  flameproof  casserole  dish  with  the  olive  oil  and  cook  gently  for  5  minutes  before  adding  the  spring  onions.  Cook  these  for  5  minutes  in  turn  before  adding  the  cabbage. 

After  a  further  5  minutes,  add  the  tomatoes  and  peas.  Season  with  the  sugar,  in  addition  to  salt  and  freshly  ground  black  pepper.  Add  enough  water  to  just  cover  the  vegetables  and  simmer  gently  for 10  minutes.

When  the  vegetables  are  tender  –  but  still  firm,  rather  than  stewed  –  poach  the  eggs  by  slipping  them  one  by  one  into  a  saucepan  of  simmering  water  (laced  with  a  little  vinegar,  unless  the  eggs  are  freshly  laid).

Place  the  toasts  into  soup  plates  and  lift  the  eggs  out  onto  the  toasts.  Ladle  the  stew  –  it  should  not  be  wet  enough  to  call  a  soup  –  around  the  egg  and  take  to  the  table.  Serve  with  grated  Parmesan,  if  liked.

Credits

Role Contributor
Presenter Dan Saladino
Interviewed Guest Rowley Leigh

Broadcast

The Food & Farming Awards 2018

The Food & Farming Awards 2018

Tell us about the food and drink heroes who should win.

Download this programme

Download this programme

Subscribe to this programme or download individual episodes.

Can comfort foods really make you feel better?

Can comfort foods really make you feel better?

Yes they can, says Sheila Dillon.

Podcast