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Paul Lewis, Bayeux Tapestry, London Sinfonietta

Tom Service meets Paul Lewis, one of the UK's leading pianists as he embarks on a landmark series of recitals exploring the music of Haydn, Beethoven and Brahms.

Presented by Tom Service.

Tom Service meets Paul Lewis, one of the UK's leading pianists as he embarks on a landmark series of recitals exploring the music of Haydn, Beethoven and Brahms. They discuss the parallels and connections which exist between these composers' works, and enjoy the beauty, humour, tragedy and serenity found in their writing for the piano.

It's the London Sinfonietta's 50th birthday and the ensemble have dug deep in their archives to create a collection of 50 objects to celebrate. Tom joins their artistic director and chief executive, Andrew Burke, and oboist/composer, Melinda Maxwell at London Sinfonietta HQ to look over the collection and talks to composer Harrison Birtwistle, and visual artist and composer Christian Marclay about the way the ensemble has pushed the boundaries in their first half century.

The Bayeux Tapestry is to visit the UK for the first time in its history, but what were the sounds and music that heralded the Norman Conquest. Jeremy Llewellyn of Oxford University tells all.

Plus, a new book on Brahms's relationship with his poets by Natasha Loges. Tom visits Natasha and her husband, bass-baritone, Stephan Loges at their home as they share their love of Brahms' lieder performing two of their favourite songs, and offer their discoveries about the composer and the poets he set to music.

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44 minutes

Chapters

  • Paul Lewis

    Duration: 13:50

  • London Sinfonietta @50

    Duration: 11:00

  • Natasha Loges & Stephan Loges on "Brahms and his Poets" Book

    Duration: 13:37

  • Bayeux Tapestry

    Duration: 03:27

Credits

Role Contributor
Presenter Tom Service
Interviewed Guest Paul Lewis
Interviewed Guest Natasha Loges

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