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Donald Macleod gives opera a health-check, and finds it to be alive and well in the 21st century, featuring works by Birtwistle, Dillon, Andriessen, Harvey and Stockhausen.

In conversation with novelist, critic and opera librettist Paul Griffiths, Donald Macleod gives opera a health-check, and finds it to be alive and well in the 21st century. Today they consider works by Harrison Birtwistle, James Dillon, Louis Andriessen, Jonathan Harvey and Karlheinz Stockhausen that either draw on or create their own myth.

Harrison Birtwistle
The Minotaur: Scene 5, extract
John Tomlinson, bass (The Minotaur)
Rebecca Bottone, soprano (First Innocent / Young Woman #1)
Orchestra and Chorus of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden
Antonio Pappano, conductor

James Dillon
Philomela: Act 3 scene 3 - The Violation
Anu Komsi, soprano (Philomela)
Remix Ensemble
Jurjen Hempel, conductor

Louis Andriessen
La Commedia: Part IV - The Garden of Earthly Delights, excerpt
Marcel Beekman, tenor (Casella)
Cristina Zavalloni, voice (Dante)
Asko Ensemble
Schönberg Ensemble
Reinbert de Leeuw, conductor

Jonathan Harvey
Wagner Dream: Scene 8, excerpt
Claire Booth (Prakriti)
Rebecca de Pont Davies (Mother)
Richard Angas (Old Brahmin)
Gordon Gietz (Ananda)
Dale Duesing (Buddha)
Johann Leysen, speaker (Wagner)
Bracha van Doesburgh, speaker (Carrie Pringle)
Ictus Ensemble
Martyn Brabbins, conductor

Karlheinz Stockhausen
Düfte - Zeichen (Scents - Signs), for 7 vocalists, boy's voice and synthesizer, from Sonntag aus Licht; excerpt
Isolde Siebert, high soprano
Ksenija Lukič, soprano
Susanne Otto, alto
Hubert Mayer, high tenor
Bernhard Gärtner, tenor
Jonathan de la Paz Zaens, baritone
Nicholas Isherwood, bass
Antonio Pérez Abellán, synthesizer
Karlheinz Stockhausen, musical supervision and sound projection.

1 hour

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