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ENO premieres Wigglesworth's The Winter's Tale

With Tom Service. Including composer Ryan Wigglesworth and director Rory Kinnear on their opera based on Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, plus Plymouth's Peninsula Arts Festival.

As a new opera based on Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale opens at English National Opera this week, Tom Service meets its creators, the composer-conductor Ryan Wigglesworth and director Rory Kinnear, and steps inside rehearsals to talk to Sophie Bevan, who sings the role of Hermione.

Tom also explores the music and ideas in a new book by the music journalist Tim Rutherford-Johnson. Music After the Fall sets out to answer questions about the complex relationship between new music and wider culture since 1989.

And he travels to Devon for this year's Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival, Voice 2.0, staged in partnership with Plymouth University’s pioneering Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research. Tom meets the ICCMR's director Eduardo Reck Miranda, whose work for human and synthetic voices, Vov, features a new language by David Peterson, creator of the Dothraki language for Games of Thrones. Alexis Kirke explains how he's analysed the emotional content of lyrics by Lennon and McCartney for his new piece Come Together, and Nuria Bonnet demonstrates how she's using data from a buoy in Looe harbour in her electronic work Voice of the Sea.

Available now

45 minutes

Chapters

  • Ryan Wigglesworth's The Winter's Tale

    Duration: 12:06

  • Music After the Fall

    Duration: 13:07

  • Voice 2.0 - Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival

    Duration: 16:56

Credits

Role Contributor
Presenter Tom Service
Interviewed Guest Ryan Wigglesworth
Interviewed Guest Rory Kinnear
Interviewed Guest Sophie Bevan
Interviewed Guest Eduardo Reck Miranda
Interviewed Guest Alexis Kirke
Interviewed Guest Nuria Bonnet

Broadcasts

Knock on wood – six stunning wooden concert halls around the world

Knock on wood – six stunning wooden concert halls around the world

Steel and concrete can't beat good old wood to produce the best sounds for music.

The evolution of video game music

The evolution of video game music

Tom Service traces the rise of an exciting new genre, from bleeps to responsive scores.

Why music can literally make us lose track of time

Why music can literally make us lose track of time

Try our psychoacoustic experiment to see how tempo can affect your timekeeping abilities.

Podcast