Sorry, this episode is not currently available

Episode 12

Sunday Morning Live, Series 7 Episode 12 of 20

Naga Munchetty and guests discuss whether faith schools only admit believers, if sexism should be considered a hate crime and the legalisation of medical cannabis.

As part of an education overhaul, prime minister Theresa May has announced the removal of a 50% cap on faith schools admissions, which had kept at least half their places open to children, regardless of the religion or beliefs of their parents. Critics say by allowing the schools to prioritise certain religions they risk entrenching divisions and could promote segregation in an already divided country. Faith schools defend the decision by stating they remain fully committed to making Britain more diverse and tolerant. Will schools being free to select by faith damage Britain? Or is it now the time to abolish the cap?

Racism and homophobia are taken seriously as hate crimes, but sexism is often dismissed as 'banter' or harmless. Now Nottinghamshire Police has become the first force in the country to record harassment of women as a hate crime. The policy was officially launched in mid-July, and now could be taken up by other police forces including Devon, Cornwall, Lincolnshire and Durham. Could this set a precedent for other regions? What's the difference between an admiring glance, and an intimidating stare? And is it the kind of behavior that can be policed?

Taking cannabis for medical reasons should be made legal, says a group of politicians. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Drug Policy Reform wants the Home Office to reclassify herbal cannabis under existing drug laws, putting it in the same category as steroids and sedatives - meaning doctors could prescribe cannabis to patients, and chemists could dispense it. Patients might even be allowed to grow limited amounts of cannabis for their own consumption. At the moment anyone using the drug, even for medical reasons, could be charged for possession. The NHS warns that cannabis use carries a number of risks, including harm to mental health, fertility or unborn babies. The Government has also stated there are no plans to legalise cannabis. But is it time to change how we think about drugs, and move towards a more relaxed attitude like some of our European counterparts? Do the benefits of using cannabis to those suffering from ailments outweigh the risks?

Plus Tommy Sandhu meets Britain's favourite gardener Alan Titchmarsh. The pair reminisce about Ground Force being the Great British Bake Off of their day, and how after writing numerous gardening books, Alan now enjoys penning romantic novels. And X Factor star Jahméne Douglas performs his single 'I Wish' for World Peace Day.

Release date:

1 hour

Last on

Sun 18 Sep 2016 10:00

On this week's programme...

Naga Munchetty and guests will discuss:

Should faith schools only admit believers?
As part of an education overhaul, Prime Minister Theresa May has announced the removal of a 50% cap on faith schools admissions, which had kept at least half their places open to children, regardless of the religion or beliefs of their parents.
Critics say by allowing the schools to prioritise certain religions they risk entrenching divisions and could promote segregation in an already divided country. Faith Schools defend the decision by stating they remain fully committed to making Britain more diverse and tolerant.
Will schools being free to select by faith damage Britain?  Or is it now the time to abolish the cap? 

Should sexism be a hate crime?
Racism and homophobia are taken seriously as hate crimes, but sexism is often dismissed as 'banter' or harmless.
Now Nottinghamshire Police has become the first force in the country to record harassment of women as a hate crime. The policy was officially launched in May, and now could be taken up by other police forces including Devon, Cornwall, Lincolnshire and Durham. Could this set a precedent for other regions? 
A report by the Women and Equalities Committee released this week also highlights the volume of sexual harassment and sexual violence towards girls in schools and suggests better reporting of harassment related incidents needs to be prioritised in the classroom.
What's the difference between an admiring glance, and an intimidating stare? And is it the kind of behaviour that can be policed?

Should cannabis be legalised?
Taking cannabis for medical reasons should be made legal, says a group of politicians.
The All Party Parliamentary Group on Drug Policy Reform wants the Home Office to reclassify herbal cannabis under existing drug laws, putting it in the same category as steroids and sedatives - meaning doctors could prescribe cannabis to patients, and chemists could dispense it.
Patients might even be allowed to grow limited amounts of cannabis for their own consumption.

At the moment anyone using the drug, even for medical reasons, could be charged for possession.
The NHS warns that cannabis use carries a number of risks, including harm to mental health, fertility or unborn babies. The Government has also stated there are no plans to legalise cannabis.

But is it time to change how we think about drugs, and move towards a more relaxed attitude like some of our European counterparts? Do the benefits of using cannabis to those suffering from ailments outweigh the risks? 

Plus Tommy Sandhu meets Britain's favourite gardener Alan Titchmarsh. The pair reminisce about Ground Force being the Great British Bake Off of its day, and how after writing numerous gardening books, Alan now enjoys penning romantic novels. 

And X Factor star Jahmene Douglas performs his single 'I Wish' for World Peace Day.

Credits

Role Contributor
PresenterNaga Munchetty
EditorKuljinder Khalia
ProducerMuireann McGinty
Assistant ProducerStephen McVey