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13/04/2016

Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

Release date:

3 hours

Last on

Wed 13 Apr 2016 06:00

Today's running order


0650

Wholesale UK gas and electricity prices have averaged 10-year lows in the first quarter of this year. So why aren’t these lower costs being passed on to consumers? Speaking live on the programme is Zoe Double, head of Power at ICIS, the independent authority on energy market pricing.

0655

An area of British land more than three times the size of Greater London is owned by secret companies in offshore jurisdictions like the British Virgin Islands. Speaking live on the programme is Chido Dunn from Global Witness.

0710

Immigration is at the top of the list of voters concerns. A new analysis by the Migration Observatory at Oxford University says that Spain, Italy and Portugal have become key countries contributing to the growth of migration here. Speaking live on the programme is Madeleine Sumption, director of the Migration Observatory at the University of Oxford.

0715

There was another allegation of anti-Semitism in the Labour party this week - this time resulting in the suspension of a councillor in Luton. The BBC’s Ross Hawkins reports.

0720

Something rather astonishing is going on in the world of big pharma. When it comes to gene editing there is an unprecedented level of collaboration - the sharing of knowledge about a technology with the potential of revolutionising bio-medical research. Today’s science editor Tom Feilden reports.

0730

Culture Secretary John Whittingdale confirmed last night that he had had a relationship with a woman who turned out to be a sex worker. A number of newspapers are said to have known about the story but it went unpublished. Speaking live on the programme is Evan Harris, executive director of Hacked Off and Neil Wallis, former deputy editor of News of the World.

0740

How to behave in the event of a nuclear attack - how not to talk to strangers - how to cross the road - all have been the subject of public information films dating back more than a century. The British Film Institute has now made a collection of 100 of the films available online. Speaking live on the programme Patrick Russell, curator at the BFI.

0750

Alongside the regional, local and mayoral elections on May 5 there will be elections in England and Wales for Police and Crime Commissioners - 41 in all, representing every police area apart from London and Greater Manchester. Live on the programme is Ron Ball, Police and Crime Commissioner for Warwickshire, and Lord Wasserman, former government adviser on Policing and criminal justice and the architect of PCCs.

0810

Immigration is at the top of the list of voters concerns. A new analysis by the Migration Observatory at Oxford University says that Spain, Italy and Portugal have become key countries contributing to the growth of migration here. Stephen Parkinson is former special advisor at the Home Office and now a national organiser for Vote Leave.

0820

Culture Secretary John Whittingdale confirmed last night that he had had a relationship with a woman who turned out to be a sex worker. A fact he says he discovered from a reporter. A number of newspapers are said to have known about the story but it went unpublished. Laura Kuenssberg is the BBC’s Political editor.

0825

Jurgen Todenhofer spent 10 days with the so-called Islamic State in Syria and Iraq back in December 2014 trying to find out what makes the terrorist cell tick. Accompanied by his son, Frederic, who photographed the journey, he asked them to explain their motivations and goals. He has now written a book My Journey Into the Heart of Terror, which is published next week.

0830

The former Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge has warned that parliamentary sovereignty is being seriously undermined by the growth of so called 'Henry VIII' clauses, which enable ministers to change law without parliamentary scrutiny. Speaking on the programme is Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge and former home secretary Jack Straw.

0835

Diane Abbot says a Labour Department for International Development would stop using the services of the big four accountancy firms to deliver aid projects if they or their client continue to use “tax havens at the direct expense of the world’s poorest nations”. We speak live to is Shadow Secretary of State for International Development, Diane Abbot.

0840

In 1816 Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, one of the key works of Gothic fiction.  To mark the anniversary this year’s Keats Shelley Prize, an annual competition for essays and poems on Romantic themes, called for entries on the theme of ‘After Frankenstein’. Speaking on the programme is Will Kemp and Riona Miller, the winners of this year’s Keats Shelley Prize.

0850

The new book India’s War: The Making of Modern South Asia, 1939-1945 details India’s contribution to World War II. It highlights India as a power in its own right, rather than a mere bastion of the British Empire. Speaking on the programme is writer of India’s War and former Indian army officer Srinath Raghavan, and Lord Slim, who served in the Indian Army and whose father William commanded the 14th Army in Burma.

 

All subject to change.

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