Sorry, this episode is not currently available

29/02/2016

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

3 hours

Last on

Mon 29 Feb 2016 06:00

Today's running order


0650

Plans are announced today to double the size of an extraordinary hydro-power scheme that creates and stores energy. The firm says it will help the UK tackle the massive challenge of creating all our energy without polluting fossil fuels. The BBC’s environment and energy analyst Roger Harrabin reports.

0655

For the past three months we have been in touch with an activist based in Raqqa from a group called Al-Sharqiya 24. He has been keeping a diary of what life is like under Islamic State. Over the next five days you will hear the casual atrocities carried out by members of IS, or Daesh, but you will also hear the realities of everyday life under a brutal regime. Speaking live on the programme is the BBC’s Mike Thomson.

0710

Today the government tries to set the date for the EU Referendum on 23 June. There will be strong opposition from the SNP, who argue that the proposed date is too close to the elections to the Scottish Parliament, and will overshadow the election campaign. Fiona Hyslop is cabinet secretary for Culture, Europe & External Affairs in the Scottish Government.

0715

900,000 retail jobs could go by 2025. Rising costs due to the National Living Wage, increasing taxes and move to online shopping could see employment levels crash and thousands of shops close. Kamal Ahmed is the BBC’s Economics editor.

0720

A survey by the Manifesto Club – a civil liberties group - has found 79 councils have used Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs) to ban certain activities judged to have “a detrimental effect on the quality of life for those in the locality”, since they came into force in October 2014. Josie Appleton is director of the Manifesto Club, a civil liberties group which has been campaigning against PSPOs and Simon Blackburn is chair of the Local Government Association's Safer Stronger Communities board.

0730

People who run charities will be officially reminded today of their legal duties and responsibilities.The warning has come from the body that oversees them, the Charities Commission. Speaking on the programme is William Shawcross, chairman of the Charity Commission for England and Wales.

0740

For the past three months we have been in touch with an activist based in Raqqa from a group called Al-Sharqiya 24. He has been keeping a diary of what life is like under Islamic State. Over the next five days you will hear the casual atrocities carried out by members of IS, or Daesh, but you will also hear the realities of everyday life under a brutal regime. For obvious reasons we have changed some details of his story and got an actor to voice his words.

0750

The Government has claimed that leaving the EU would lead to a decade of uncertainty. Matt Hancock is minister for the Cabinet Office.

0810

Britain's hospitals are suffering a serious shortage of nurses and doctors. A Freedom of Information survey of Trusts across the UK, commissioned by the BBC, suggests that 69% are trying to fix the serious shortage of medical staff by looking abroad to fill the gap by recruiting foreign nurses and doctors. Matthew Hopkins is chief executive of Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Ian Cummings is chief executive of Health Education England.

0820

Comedian Chris Rock hosted the Oscars last night amid controversy over the lack of diversity among the nominees. The BBC’s David Willis reports and we speak live to stand-up comedian Nish Kumar.

0830

Sarah Montague has been speaking to Nadia Murad, a Yazidi rights activist who was kidnapped and held by so-called Islamic State, which she calls Daesh, in 2014.

0835

The government has claimed that leaving the EU would lead to a decade of uncertainty. We speak live to Chris Grayling, leader of the Commons.

0840

A new report published by Marie Curie today is warning that poor communication in the NHS has a profound impact on patient care, staff burnout and public funds. Andrew McDonald wrote the report, drawing on personal experience of when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer and Parkinson’s disease.

0850

Before she died the Swedish artist Hilma af Klint insisted that her abstract art works were kept from public view until at least 20 years after her death, because she thought they would be misunderstood. Hilma is now recognised as one of the first abstract painters and a new exhibition opening at the Serpentine Galleries in London will this week again shows a body of her work never before exhibited in the UK. Lizzie Carey-Thomas is head of programmes at Serpentine Galleries and Jennifer Higgie is co-editor of the London-based contemporary arts magazine, Frieze.

0855

Why do we post selfies in England and footies (photos of their feet) in Chile? How quintessentially English are we when it comes to our social media activity? These are a few of the big themes explored in Why We Post - a global social media research project carried out by a team of UCL anthropologists. Daniel Miller is professor of Anthropology at UCL, who led the project, and Elisabetta Costa is Anthropologist at the British Institute at Ankara.

 

All subject to change.

Broadcast

Puzzle for Today

Enjoy a brainteaser from the Today team

So you think you know the Today programme?

Try our test and enjoy some wonderful – and sometimes hilarious – moments from the past.

Life Inside ‘Islamic State’: Diaries

An activist based in Raqqa, Syria describes the horror of everyday life in the city.