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6 Music Celebrates Great British Venues - Stoke

Steve Lamacq tours five cities around the UK, shining a light on the alternative music scene in each area and celebrating the venues which are its bedrock. He continues in Stoke.

Across this week, Steve Lamacq tours five cities around the UK, shining a light on the alternative music scene in each area and celebrating the venues which are its bedrock.
Steve will be broadcasting his show live from Glasgow, Hull, Stoke, Southampton, Cardiff, in collaboration with Independent Venue Week - an annual celebration of the country's indie venues, which host gigs and events over seven days to raise awareness of grassroots music venues.
In each of the areas he visits, he'll be meeting gig-goers and hearing their memories of the alternative music scene. Steve will be presenting his show from the BBC Local Radio stations in each of the locations and visiting venues in each area - King Tuts in Glasgow, The Adelphi in Hull, The Sugarmill in Stoke, The Joiners in Southampton and Clwb Ifor Bach in Cardiff. And in each show, Steve will be chatting to the BBC Introducing presenter from the area, getting the lowdown on the best new local bands around and featuring a special acoustic session by one of them.
On Monday, Steve starts the week off in Glasgow, talking to the owners of the Broadcast venue and telling the stories of the legendary King Tuts. He'll also be speaking to Vic Galloway from BBC Introducing in Scotland, who'll be giving him the lowdown on the best new Scottish bands around, plus there will be a special acoustic session by one of them. On Tuesday Steve will be in Hull, talking to the owner of the The Adelphi; on Wednesday he visits Stoke, talking to the owner of the The Sugarmill; Thursday's show comes from Southampton where he meets the owner of The Joiners; and Friday's show is from Cardiff where he chats to the owner of the Clwb Ifor Bach (aka The Welsh Club).
Since 2007, London has lost 35% of its grassroots music venues and this is a trend being seen across the country. In places where there is just one alternative music venue, they are the vital source of cultural stimulus and have huge importance in that area, whilst also providing the first step on the ladder for many an aspiring artist. The Rolling Stones, David Bowie, the Clash, Oasis, Ed Sheeran and Adele are just some of the big names who have all learnt their craft on the small venue circuit.
This week's programming is part of People's History of Pop - a four-part series coming to BBC Four later this year - for which listeners are encouraged to upload their pop memorabilia to the People's History of Pop website at bbc.co.uk/peoplespop. The television series will be tracking the history of pop from the 1950s to the 1990s through the stories behind the treasured, personal and rarest music memorabilia owned by the public, whether that be precious band t-shirts, photos, badges, ticket stubs, fan club materials, gig programmes, annuals, teen diary entries, teen band recordings, wrist bands, rare footage - it will all shape and define the series. This material will create a unique online archive that brings together the UK's musical history. The series is looking for contributors who have submitted the most surprising, moving and rare material who may then be filmed to appear in the programme.

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