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Eurydice and Orpheus

Her Story, by Simon Armitage. A busking musician discovers a natural talent for the harp that has a deep, irreversible effect on his and his lover's lives. Music by PJ Harvey.

The myth of Orpheus and Eurydice has inspired poets, painters and especially musicians since ancient times. As a season of revivals at the Royal Opera House season explores this most potent of musical stories, poet Simon Armitage and playwright Linda Marshall Griffiths each tell their own versions of the story of the doomed lovers on Radio 4.

Eurydice and Orpheus. Her story...by Simon Armitage .

Sanna is a lab technician in a seed vault at a university. She stores and tends to seeds from flowers and trees from all over the world . She mostly loves the flowers ...Coltsfoot, Early Star of Bethlehem, Lady's Bedstraw, Farewell to Spring, Eyebright, Forget-me-not ...

She's had her eye on a busking musician she passes on her way home from work in the subway . One evening, on a whim, she stops to talk . They quickly become close and fall in love. Sanna persuades Zak to turn his back on a life of drugs and crime. Having survived withdrawal, this gifted musician picks up a harp and discovers that he has an overwhelming natural talent, one that will have a deep, irreversible effect on both their lives.

Eurydice and Orpheus by Simon Armitage

Her Story

Harpist - Jon Banks
With electronic music composed by PJ Harvey

Produced in Salford by Susan Roberts.

45 minutes

Last on

Wed 24 May 2017 14:15

Credits

Role Contributor
Writer Simon Armitage
Sanna Claire Price
Zak Bryan Dick
Richard Jonathan Keeble
Announcer Jonathan Keeble
Gill Alexandra Mathie
Woman Alexandra Mathie
Doctor Stephen Fletcher
DJ Stephen Fletcher
Actor Stephen Fletcher
Producer Susan Roberts

Broadcasts

Audio Books - great readings

Audio Books - great readings

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The Shakespeare Sessions

The Shakespeare Sessions

Immerse yourself in Shakespeare’s world