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04/09/2015

Morning news and current affairs. Includes Sports Desk, Weather, Thought for the Day.

3 hours

Last on

Fri 4 Sep 2015 06:00

Today's running order

0645

A Cambridge University study has found that spending an extra hour in front of the screen as a teenager results in the equivalent of the difference between two grades at GCSE level. The study found that those who spent a similar time doing their homework and reading did better. Dr Kirsten Cordon was the lead author of Screentime study.

0650

With every passing day, the migrant crisis grows worse. The numbers are growing, the stories of suffering are horrendous, and there have been violent clashes in Hungary between police and the refugees. Europe’s leaders are divided over what to do to solve the crisis. David Cameron will be in Madrid and Lisbon for talks with his counterparts over his plans for reform of the EU – although this crisis is likely to overshadow that agenda. The Prime Minister is widely expected to soften his stance today on not taking big numbers of migrants at the summit – but by how much? Chris Buckler reports from Kos where the European Commissioner responsible  for migration is due to arrive today.

0655

There was indecision overnight from the American Vice President Joe Biden as he wondered if he had 'the emotional energy' for another run at the presidency, challenging Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination. Jon Sopel is the North America editor.

0710

With every passing day, the migrant crisis grows worse. The numbers are growing, the stories of suffering are horrendous, and there have been violent clashes in Hungary between police and the refugees (see 0650). Sir Malcolm Rifkind is a former Foreign Secretary.

0715

The Army has unveiled a crackdown on bullying and sexual harassment in its ranks.  The Chief of the general staff says unacceptable behaviour will be stamped out and General Nick Carter has produced a new code of conduct for all ranks to follow.  It's after a recent survey found that almost half of service personnel felt sexual harassment was a problem in parts of the army. Our reporter Sima Kotecha was at the conference.

0720

Kids are back at school this week across the UK (and have been for a few weeks in Scotland). As well all know, an unrelenting source of frustration for parents sending their kids off to school is their total inability to tie their shoelaces. How hard can it be? Ian Fieggen is known as Professor Shoelace.

0730

With every passing day, the migrant crisis grows worse. The numbers are growing, the stories of suffering are horrendous, and there have been violent clashes in Hungary between police and the refugees (see 0650). Chief correspondence Matthew Price has been speaking to a family of migrants in Hungary.

0740                                                                                                                                   

The incoming President of the British Science Association (BSA), Professor Dame Athene Donald is calling for major changes to the UK education system ahead of her upcoming address at the British Science Festival next week. She also says more needs to be done to counter stereotyping which puts women off going into science – and that girls should be encouraged to play with boys’ toys like Lego and Meccano, and not left braiding their Barbies’ hair…..

0750

EDF have announced that Hinkley Point C will not be operational by 2023 as previously announced. This is the second time it’s been delayed – it was originally due for completion in 2017. EDF announced the first delay in February of this year. EDF Chief Executive, Jean-Bernard Levy gave no new completion date. Hinkley Point C will be the first nuclear power station to be built in the UK for over 20 years, and has been heralded by David Cameron as his Government’s major infrastructure investment. Lord Hutton is chair of Nuclear Industry Association and a former Labour Defence Secretary and Tom Burke is chair of E3G – ‘Third Generation Environmentalism’ – a non-profit that advocates sustainable development. Tom is also a part-time Environmental Policy Adviser to Rio Tinto.

0810

With every passing day, the migrant crisis grows worse. The numbers are growing, the stories of suffering are horrendous, and there have been violent clashes in Hungary between police and the refugees (see 0650). Chief correspondent Matthew Price is in Hungary and we speak to Miroslav Lajčák, Deputy PM and Foreign Minister of Slovakia, Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis and political editor Laura Kuenssberg.

0820                                                            

The scrambling for the presidential nominations in the United States is in full swing, in both parties. We heard yesterday from Hillary Clinton's camp. Now the Republican side. I've been talking to an important Republic fund-raiser, Antony Scaramucci, who was finance chief for Mitt Romney's losing campaign in 2012 and in this race is backing the Wisconsin governor Scott Walker. As you'll hear - despite Donald Trump's statement overnight that he wouldn't consider a third-party run, which is being taken as a sign that he thinks he really can win the party nomination - Mr Scaramucci doesn't think he can last the course. In his office in New York I asked him what he thought the Republicans had to do to win the White House next year.

0830

With every passing day, the migrant crisis grows worse. The numbers are growing, the stories of suffering are horrendous, and there have been violent clashes in Hungary between police and the refugees (see 0650). Our correspondent Tom Burridge is in Madrid and Portuguese European Minister Bruno Macaes.

0840

A year ago this month President Ashraf Ghani took office in Afghanistan, promising peace and prosperity for his country after years of conflict and hardship.  But a year on, the challenges remain.  With the withdrawal of foreign troops, except for a rump support mission, security in Afghanistan if anything has worsened.  The Taliban, facing its own internal power struggle, has recently stepped up attacks in the capital Kabul, as well as outlying provinces and towns such as Musa Qala in Helmand where British troops were once based.  Our World Affairs Editor, John Simpson, has returned to Kabul, and reflects now on the Afghanistan of today.

0850

A Cambridge University study has found that spending an extra hour in front of the screen as a teenager results in the equivalent of the difference between two grades at GCSE level. Laverne Antrobus is a consultant child and educational psychologist and Sue Plummer is a literacy expert and author of ‘Toxic Childhood: How the Modern World is Damaging our children and what we can do about it’.

All subject to change.

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