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22/04/2015

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

3 hours

Last on

Wed 22 Apr 2015 06:00

Today's running order

0645

A BBC documentary due to be screened tonight explains how Islamic State was formed in the wake of the American and British invasion of Iraq in Camp Bucca - an American detention camp in southern Iraq – in much the same way the IRA leadership came together in an internment camp in Northern Ireland known as Long Kesh. Peter Taylor is a journalist and documentary maker.

0650

The Socialist Labour Party launched their manifesto in Port Talbot last night. Ken Capstick is the Treasurer of the Socialist Labour Party.

0655

There's been a reduction in the number of people seeking hospital treatment for injuries caused by acts of violence in England and Wales. An annual survey of 117 accident and emergency departments and minor injury units by Cardiff University suggests violence has fallen to its lowest level since the study began 15 years ago.  Professor Jonathan Shepherd is the research author & Director of the Violence Research Group.

0710

Tesco could report a multi-billion pound annual loss this morning as it undergoes the latest phase of its shake-up under new boss Dave Lewis. Britain's biggest supermarket will post its first yearly figures since Mr Lewis was appointed to turn around its fortunes. It follows a series of profit warnings amid a ferocious price war with rivals. Analysts also expect the retailer to write down the value of its properties by around £3 billion as well as facing up to a pension fund deficit swelling to as much as £5 billion. Tanya Beckett is a BBC business presenter and Lord Haskins is a former chairman of Northern Foods.

0715

One of Britain's leading environmentalists, James Lovelock, has waded into the election debate criticising politicians for ducking the most important issue facing the planet - climate change. With less than a year to go before world leaders meet in Paris to try and hammer out a binding deal to halt global warming, the creator of the Gaia theory, says he's shocked that politicians here have barely mentioned climate change. Our reporter Tom Feilden spoke to James Lovelock.

0720

Two major collections of the much loved poet Rupert Brooke are unveiled this week. The John Shroder Collection has been bought by King’s College, Cambridge, which contained all the material collected by one of the 2 RB trustees - Eddie Marsh, his great friend and original biographer. The other comes in the publication of a new book "The Second I Saw You" by Lorna Beckett which uses letters and a memoir of Phyllis Gardener that were left (with a 50 year embargo) to the British Library. Lorna Beckett is the author of "The Second I Saw You" and chairman of the Rupert Brooke Society and Patricia McGuire is a King’s College Archivist.

0730

Since the recession there has been a continuing debate over the best ways to ensure growth in the economy and whether politicians can control that. In the centre of Birmingham we can see the image of a city that the town hall wants to project – theatres, restaurants and cafes. But a 5 minute drive from the city centre the picture is more mixed. In Digbeth things are changing, there is a slow and steady transformation from old industry to services and entertainment and the arts. But, is that change excluding many of those who currently work and live in the area? John Humphrys reports.

0740                                                                                                                                   

A lot has been made of the breakdown in trust between the public and the police. Last year, the chairman of the Police Federation said it was essential for the police to rebuild that trust after it had been seriously damaged due to a series of negative stories. But in some parts of the country, the bobby on the beat is still very much valued and trusted. A month ago, six thousand people lined the streets of Falmouth to pay tribute to their local policeman after he suddenly died while off duty. PC Andy Hocking was just 52. Our reporter Sima Kotecha has been to the town in Cornwall to ask his wife and the locals why he was so special.

0750

Prosecutors in Italy have spoken to the BBC about what they intend to do with two of the survivors of the boat that sank off the shores of Italy. The United Nations says it now fears 800 people died when a boat crammed with migrants sank off Libya on Sunday. The two men; a Tunisian man who's believed to have been the captain of the vessel, and a Syrian crew member were detained on suspicion of people smuggling when an Italian coast guard ship carrying survivors reached the Sicilian port of Catania. Meanwhile an emergency EU summit will take place in Brussels tomorrow to discuss the general migrant crisis that has hit the Mediterranean. Bernadino Leon is the UN envoy for Libya and Katya Adler is the BBC Europe Editor.

0810

Tesco could report a multi-billion pound annual loss this morning as it undergoes the latest phase of its shake-up under new boss Dave Lewis (see 0710). Kamal Ahmed is our business editor and Bruno Monteyne is a senior analyst at European Food Retail and was Tesco’s Supply Chain Director (Asia) until mid-2012.

0820                                                            

Prosecutors in Italy have spoken to the BBC about what they intend to do with two of the survivors of the boat that sank off the shores of Italy (see 0750). Our World Affairs Correspondent Paul Adams is in Catania in Sicily finding out what impact the crisis is having on the people of the town.

0825

In 2009 the Tehran-born Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari was imprisoned and tortured for 118 days in Iran. He’d been covering the presidential elections, and had sent footage of opposition protests to the BBC before being arrested by the Revolutionary Guard. Amongst the western media that campaigned for his release was the American satirical news programme The Daily Show, and Bahari was interviewed by its host Jon Stewart following his release.  Now Stewart has made his first feature film, Rosewater, based on Bahari’s story. Jon Stewart is host of The Daily Show and writer/director of the film Rosewater.

0830

Millions of public sector workers will be spared further pay cuts under Liberal Democrat plans set out by Nick Clegg today. The Lib Dem leader is promising pay will rise in line with inflation, bringing an end to the coalition's pay restraint policy - potentially benefiting nearly 5 and a half million people. David Laws is chair of the Liberal Democrat General Election Manifesto Group for 2015.

0835

A Saudi Arabia-led coalition has ended its bombing campaign against rebels in Yemen having "achieved its military goals", officials say. The month-long Decisive Storm campaign had targeted Houthi rebels but largely failed to halt their advance. A new operation called Restoring Hope will focus on a political solution in Yemen and on counter-terrorism at home, the coalition said. Jeremy Bowen is the BBC’s Middle East Editor.

0840

A lot has been made of the breakdown in trust between the public and the police (see 0740). Dr Tim Brain is a former Chief Constable.

0845

One hundred years ago today the nature of war changed for ever - during the second battle of Ypres the Germans released more than a hundred tons of Chlorine gas - the first time such a chemical had been used as a lethal weapon.  What makes the centenary so chilling is that today Chlorine is still being used to kill and spread terror, this time on the battlefields of Syria and Iraq. Angus Crawford reports on this toxic legacy of the First World War.

0850

One of Britain's leading environmentalists, James Lovelock, has waded into the election debate criticising politicians for ducking the most important issue facing the planet - climate change (see 0715). Sir Brian Hoskins is chair of the Grantham Institute at Imperial College and a Professor at University of Reading.

0855

Ed Miliband was mobbed by a hen party on Saturday. It was a rare moment of unplanned interaction in an election battle which has seen the main party leaders encountering the public on the pavements rather less frequently than in campaigns past. John Major found on his soapbox in 1992 that meeting the public in the wild can be a vote winner. Or it can lead to crises which define a losing campaign, like Gordon Brown’s meeting with Gillian Duffy in 2010. So is this campaign worse for the absence so far of such encounters? Tim Collins is a former Tory MP and was press secretary to John Major during the 1992 campaign and Elinor Goodman is a former political editor of Channel 4 News  and covered the 1992 election campaign.

All subject to change.

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