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Mark Elder

Mark Elder talks to Petroc Trelawny about his career as a conductor, from his time at English National Opera, plus his early mentors and his ongoing relationship with the Halle.

Petroc Trelawny talks to Sir Mark Elder, music director of the Hallé Orchestra, about his career to date. Mark Elder discusses his early mentors, working with Sir Edward Downes, his time as music director of English National Opera, his love of opera and his championing of British music, and his ongoing long-term relationship with the Hallé.

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45 minutes

MARK ELDER

MARK ELDER

In an extended interview Petroc Trelawny talks to Sir Mark Elder, Music Director of the Hallé Orchestra, about his career to date.  Elder discusses his early influences including his discovery of opera, his first role on the staff at the Royal Opera House, and working with his mentor Sir Edward Downes in Sydney at Opera Australia.  He recalls his time as Music Director of English National Opera in the 1980s as part of the “powerhouse” team with David Pountney and Peter Jonas, reflects on missing out on the top job at Covent Garden, and enthuses about his involvement in concerts and recordings for the Opera Rara label.  Mark Elder also talks to Petroc about his love of Wagner, his longstanding and deep relationship with the Hallé and the regeneration of Manchester, as well as his championing of English music, from Elgar and Vaughan Williams to Finzi and Bax.

More information:

Mark Elder

Hallé Orchestra

Opera Rara

English National Opera

 

Credits

Role Contributor
Presenter Petroc Trelawny
Interviewed Guest Mark Elder

Broadcast

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