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Art: The Real Thing

Roger Scruton asks what makes for real art, as opposed to cliche or kitsch. Real art, he says, needs beauty, form and redemption.

In the last of his three talks on art Roger Scruton asks what constitutes real art, as opposed to cliche or kitsch.

He says we must ignore the vast quantities of art produced as commodities to be sold, in contrast to symphonies or novels that cannot be owned in the same way as a painting or a sculpture.

Real art has to have lasting appeal, he argues, and for that it needs three things: beauty, form and redemption. The production of such art, he says, takes immense hard work and attention to detail, but it can give meaning to our modern lives and show love in the midst of doubt and desolation.

Producer: Arlene Gregorius.

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10 minutes

Last on

Sun 21 Dec 2014 08:48

A Point of View: How do we know real art when we see it?

A Point of View: How do we know real art when we see it?

In the last of a three-part series, writer and philosopher Roger Scruton tries to define the elements which make a great work of art.

Read Roger Scruton's article on the BBC News website

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Presenter Roger Scruton
Production Assistant Arlene Gregorius

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