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19/11/2014

Morning news and current affairs. Including Sports Desk, Yesterday in Parliament, Weather and Thought for the Day.

3 hours

Last on

Wed 19 Nov 2014 06:00

Today's running order

0650

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has vowed to win a "battle for Jerusalem", promising a harsh response to the attack which killed four rabbis at a synagogue in the city. The murders reflect increased tensions in the city over the last few weeks, and the revival of a dispute about who can worship at the al-Haram al-Sharif, or Temple Mount site, within the walls of the Old City. Our Middle East Correspondent Kevin Connolly reflects on the history of this contested city.

0710

Ofsted has warned that children are at risk of sexual exploitation and abuse because local councils are not doing their job properly. The children's services inspector says that despite a string of scandals, council’s plans to deal with such problems are "undeveloped" and leadership is "frequently lacking". But Ofsted itself has been criticised by MPs for not exposing what was going on in Rotherham. Tim Loughton is a former children's minister.

0713

Is it right that the bedroom tax or spare room subsidy be applied to women who are so threatened by former partners that they have police approved panic rooms in their homes?   A woman in exactly that situation is taking her case to the high court.  Her solicitor is Rebecca Carrier.

0717

Business with Simon Jack.

0720

There is a new mission to the moon, with a twist, it is going to be crowd funded to begin with and then has rather ingenious ways of raising extra cash.   It's being run by Ian Taylor, former Conservative science minister.

0723

Earlier this week David Cameron met the new Indian prime minister at the G20 meeting in Brisbane. Mr Modi is seen as one of India's most powerful ever leaders and is being rapturously welcomed in his foreign trips especially by the Indian diaspora. He is expected to visit the UK next year, an event which is getting the British Indian community very excited. What should Britain and the world make of India's new leader? Sanjoy Majumder reports.

0735

Performance data for thousands of NHS surgeons is being published this morning. The government says the initiative will improve transparency and drive up standards in the health service. But critics, including some surgeons, say the figures misinform the public. We speak to Ian Martin, from the Federation of Surgical Speciality Associations, and Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, the medical director of NHS England.

0745

Many listeners have been in touch since our item about a tapestry which is being created to mark the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta on Tuesday morning’s programme. John Humphrys asked the embroiderer Rhoda Nevin why embroidery seemed to be more popular with women than men. Is there a stigma attached to embroidery for men or are more of them now taking it up? Professor Malcolm Lochhead is a textile artist.

0750

The British nurse who has returned to Sierra Leone after recovering from Ebola has told the BBC he's "frustrated" by the "woefully slow" international response to the outbreak. Will Pooley is back at the heart of the crisis, treating patients at the Connaught Hospital in the capital Freetown. He's been speaking to our global health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar.

0810

Ofsted has warned that children are at risk of sexual exploitation and abuse because local councils are not doing their job properly. The children's services inspector says that despite a string of scandals, council’s plans to deal with such problems are "undeveloped" and leadership is "frequently lacking". But Ofsted itself has been criticised by MPs for not exposing what was going on in Rotherham. We hear from Today reporter Katie Inman and Ofsted’s National Director for Social Care Debbie Jones.

0820

Yesterday the government was defeated in legislation over pubs.  The vote allows pub landlords to get independent rent reviews and to buy their beer on the open market rather than being tied to a supplier. Brigid Simmonds is the chief executive of the British Beer and Pub Association. Simon Clarke is landlord at the Eagle Ale House in Clapham.

0830

The Russian foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, has called on the Ukrainian government and pro-Russian rebels to seek a peaceful solution to the crisis in eastern Ukraine. But President Putin's spokesman Dmitri Peskov has accused the West of trying to encircle Russia, amid growing tensions over the crisis in eastern Ukraine. Mikhail Kasyanov was Prime Minister of Russia between 2000 and 2004.

0835

A hotel which fined a couple £100 for leaving a bad review on Tripadvisor is being investigated by Trading Standards. Jan and Tony Jenkinson went to Blackpool for a night's stay at the Broadway Hotel on Burlington Road West. After posting a review they were astonished to see the hotel had charged £100 on their credit card. The couple contacted the hotel and were told that they should have noticed the 'no bad review' policy in the booking terms and conditions.

0842

It's almost a year since a tidal surge flooded hundreds of homes and fields along the east coast of England - the start of what became Britain's wettest winter on record. The disaster raised questions about which areas should be defended against flooding and who should pay. The people of one stretch of coastline in Norfolk have been told that government funding will stop up in two years' time and that they'll have to raise the money needed. Our science editor David Shukman reports.

0847

Later this week the Wellcome Collection will open the doors of its new £17.5m gallery with an exhibition dedicated to the pioneers of the study of sex. The Institute of Sexology will look at key sexologists through history including Sigmund Freud, Marie Stopes and Alfred Kinsey. It features over 200 erotic objects, many collected by Henry Wellcome, founder of the Wellcome Trust charity. Presenter Sarah Montague went to see the exhibition.

0853

People who fail to control Japanese knotweed in their gardens could now be hit with an Anti-social behaviour order and a fine of up to £2,500. The plant which can damage roads, pavements and buildings is one of the most destructive invasive plants in the UK.  Home Office guidance documents now specifically name the plant as a source of "serious problems" that new laws can help tackle. Helen Yemm is the “Thorny Problems” columnist for the Telegraph Gardening section.
Mike Clough is owner of Japanese Knotweed Solutions.

 

All subject to change.


 

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