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Live from the Free Thinking Festival

Live from Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival of Ideas at Sage Gateshead. Petroc Trelawny debates Why Should I Care? with Sir Thomas Allen, Kate Molleson, Sir Nicholas Kenyon, Dr. Susan Rutherford and Professor Cliff Eisen.

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45 minutes

MUSIC MATTERS AT FREE THINKING 2014 - THE LIMITS OF KNOWLEDGE: WHY SHOULD I CARE?

MUSIC MATTERS AT FREE THINKING 2014 - THE LIMITS OF KNOWLEDGE: WHY SHOULD I CARE?

Why should I care? Petroc Trelawny chairs a debate about how far knowledge can enhance our understanding and appreciation of classical music. How much do we really need to know about composers' lives in order to be able to engage fully with their creative output? Why the seemingly endless pursuit of the most authentic performance practice, or the definitive critical edition? How does knowing more than just the best bits improve the listening experience?

To discuss this with Petroc are the baritone Sir Thomas Allen, the Glasgow-based music critic Kate Molleson (who writes for the Guardian, the Herald and the Big Issue), Sir Nicholas Kenyon, Managing Director of London's Barbican Centre, Dr Susan Rutherford of Manchester University and Professor Cliff Eisen of King's College, London.

More information: BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival of Ideas 2014

Credits

Role Contributor
Presenter Petroc Trelawny
Interviewed Guest Thomas Allen
Interviewed Guest Kate Molleson
Interviewed Guest Nicholas Kenyon
Interviewed Guest Susan Rutherford
Interviewed Guest Cliff Eisen

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