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BBC micro:bit

Robots Replace Teachers

What if... robots replaced teachers and Cybermen went back to school?

BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass and Bluetooth technology. They were given free to every child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK in 2016, with the aim of inspiring 12-13 year-olds to get creative and develop core skills in science, technology and engineering. It's a great way to explore the Key Stage 3 and National 4 ICT curriculum, and introduce your students to coding. You can find more detailed information about what the micro:bit is and what the key features are here.

We at Team micro:bit have been pleased to bring you more than a year of micro:bit experiments, activities and entertainment, so we decided what better way to show our appreciation than to get in touch with our robotics buddies and cause a little havoc?

Making robots with the micro:bit has been one of our favourite activities and it can be a lot easier than you think. Find our more here.

You can also keep across all campaigns within the micro:bit initiative on the Make It Digital pages and via The micro:bit Foundation.

Find out more about micro:bit

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized codeable computer with motion detection, a built-in compass and Bluetooth technology, which was given free to every child in year 7 or equivalent across the UK in 2016.

It can be coded with something simple in seconds – like lighting up it's LEDs or displaying a pattern – with no prior knowledge of computing. Easy-to-use software is available at The micro:bit Foundation, which can be accessed from a PC, tablet or mobile.

Our goal is to make micro:bit easily available and affordable (£12 upwards). Our approved resellers will be happy to help you get your own micro:bit.

The micro:bit Foundation are working with many different countries to get it off the ground, expanding across Europe and will later add the Americas, Asia and Africa.

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