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Stonehenge is lit up to say thank you to heritage workers

Eight people were chosen, with their faces appearing on the 5,000-year-old stones to thank them for the big part they played in supporting arts and heritage during the coronavirus pandemic.
The project not only celebrates the efforts of those involved in the heritage sector, but shines a light on how important places like public gardens, historic sites and green spaces have been for people during lockdown.
Stonehenge with faces on it.Matt Alexander/PA Wire
Among those being honoured is Mick Byrne, who helped to plant thousands of trees at the National Memorial Arboretum near Lichfield in Staffordshire. Another is William Colvin from Cushendun, Northern Ireland, who rescued an old church so people had somewhere to go during lockdown.
Stonehenge with faces on it.Matt Alexander/PA Wire
James Rodliff, Operations Manager at Stonehenge, was projected onto the monument for his role in helping to care for the 5,000 year-old monument with most of his staff team off work.
Stonehenge with faces on it.Matt Alexander/PA Wire
Uzo Iwobi OBE led and delivered the first ever Black History Wales 365 initiative - with education and cultural events to support ethnic minority communities during the pandemic. Actor and comedian Sir Tony Robinson was meant to speak at the event but due to coronavirus restrictions a video projection of him was shown instead. He said the pandemic has led to people having a greater appreciation for heritage sites and the outdoors.
Stonehenge with faces on it.Matt Alexander/PA Wire