Mariana Trench: Four new species found by diver Victor Vescovo, along with plastic

Last updated at 05:36
3D map of sea floorOther

An American explorer has broken the the record for the deepest ever dive.

Victor Vescovo descended nearly 11km to the deepest place in the ocean - the Pacific Ocean's Mariana Trench.

Down there he found amazing sea creatures, but also found a plastic bag and sweet wrappers.

What is the Mariana Trench?

The Mariana Trench is a deep and long hole in the Pacific Ocean floor between Japan and Australia.

At nearly seven miles deep, you could fit the whole of Mount Everest into it.

It's the deepest place in the ocean.

Who has been there?

Victor Vescovo explores the bottom of the Mariana TrenchAtlantic Productions for Discovery Channel
Victor Vescovo spent four hours exploring the bottom of the trench

The first dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench took place in 1960 by US Navy lieutenant Don Walsh and Swiss engineer Jacques Piccard.

Movie director James Cameron - who made the films Titanic and Avatar - then made a dive in 2012 by himself in a bright green sub.

Now Victor Vescovo has broken the record for the deepest dive - by an extra 11m.

What did Victor find?

bottomAtlantic Productions for Discovery Channel

He spent four hours exploring the bottom of the trench in his sub, built to withstand the immense pressure of the deep ocean.

The team believes it has discovered four new species of prawn-like crustaceans called amphipods, saw a creature called a spoon worm 7,000m-down and a pink snailfish at 8,000m.

But he also saw evidence of plastic pollution - something that other expeditions have seen before.

Victor's team found a plastic bag and sweet wrappers.

Millions of tonnes of plastic enter the oceans each year, but where it all goes it a bit of mystery.

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