Speaking out and keeping safe: NSPCC talk to kids about their right to be safe from abuse

Last updated at 12:35
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WATCH: NSPCC talk to kids about their right to be safe from abuse

A big children's charity has told Newsround that it wants children to speak out and ask for help if they are being hurt or treated badly.

Teams from the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) go into schools to talk about something called abuse.

Abuse is when someone treats someone else badly.

That can be bullying, family problems, neglect or children being forced to do something unsafe that they don't want to do.

NSPCC experts suggest that 1 in 5 children in the UK are affected by these issues.

The most important thing is to tell an adult you trust. This could be a parent, or a teacher. They can get you the help you need.

NSPCC

Jo Humberstone, an NSPCC schools volunteer told Newsround: "It could be hitting, which can leave marks or bruises. And some people might want children to do things with their bodies which make them feel uncomfortable or unsafe.

"Sometimes this involves private parts of the body, which are the parts covered by underwear. We're saying that privates are private - they belong to you and no-one else. "

child getting advice from an adultGetty Images

New rules are being worked out by the Government about the way that caring relationships, being looked after properly and keeping safe should be taught in schools.

From next year, changes to the curriculum mean that these subjects must be be talked about in classrooms, if they aren't already, and schools can decide themselves how best to do it.

So what should children do if they are worried about any of these things?

The most important thing is to tell an adult you trust. This could be a parent, or a teacher. They can get you the help you need.

The NSPCC say it's really important to you speak out if you see or experience anything that upsets you.