Here's some of the coolest things drones are being used for

Last updated at 14:16
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Chinese takeaways delivered by drone

When you order a takeaway, you'd generally expect to see a van from the company pull up, with your extra cheesy pizza.

Or maybe someone on a bike, bringing you your chicken nuggets with extra mayo.

But how surprised would you be if it was actually being brought to you by a drone?

Well drone-delivered meals is now a thing in Shanghai in China!

Don't get too excited though - the drone doesn't actually come to people's doors.

That job is still down to a person. But the drone speeds up the delivery.

eating lo mein out of chinese take out box wih chopsticksrez-art

This is how it works - when your meal is ready, a delivery rider takes it a short distance to the nearest drone station.

Then the drone carries the meal to your nearest drone station, and another delivery rider picks up the food and takes the food to your door.

The service has just launched on the outskirts of the Chinese city, and is flying meals along 17 particular routes, bypassing busy roads that would normally mean your meal arrives late as well as cold.

Sounds pretty cool!

But this is far from the first time we've heard of drones being used for some pretty amazing things, or to make jobs quicker and easier.

In fact we've heard of drones bring used for...

Delivering parcels
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Could drones deliver our shopping?

In 2016 the UK government's got together with the retail giant Amazon to start testing flying drones that can deliver parcels to your door.

Now two years later, the system is still in development.

But if it's rolled out, it would mean that customers could place Amazon orders and receive their package very quickly.

Rules that previously blocked such services in the UK are being changed, with the National Air Traffic Control Service relaxing the rules

Could this pave the way for a sci-fi future where parcel-carrying drones clutter the skies?

Some tech experts say we could see drones bringing boxes to our front doors as soon as 2019.

Waiting on tables
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Watch the waiter drone in action

In 2015 we saw one restaurant in Singapore trying out a group of flying drones which can automatically deliver your dinner to your table.

Infinium's robots whizz above the heads of diners on paths mapped out by a computer program, and find their way using infra-red sensors placed around the restaurant.

I wonder how good their customer service is though.

Transporting people
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World's first driverless passenger drone

The world's first ever driverless passenger drone was tested in southern China earlier this year.

Passengers simply get in, belt up and let the drone drive itself to where they need to be.

It can go at 100km per hour!

Herding sheep
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The drone herding sheep

One farmer in Ireland didn't have a sheepdog, so his brother decided to try out using a drone instead.

The little remote controlled aircraft encourages the sheep into their pen.

Picking up plastic waste
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How science is helping to fight our plastic waste problem

If plastic ends up on beaches it can easily get into the sea, and cause harm to fish and animals.

This issue is that no one knows where all the plastic is - so one charity had the idea of using drones to find out.

The drone flies high up in the sky, and takes pictures of the land below.

Any plastic in the photos can then be tagged so it can be removed.

Tracking sharks
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Using drones to track sharks!

Some beaches in Australia have a real problem when it comes to sharks.

The ocean predators can sometimes end up too close to the shore, either by accident or whilst looking for food.

Many beaches have lifeguards and shark spotters to keep an eye out for the beasts, and to keep people out of the water when they appear.

But now experts are trying a new idea - drones.

They think that eyes in the sky are better at spotting sharks than humans.

Racing
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Drone racing takes over the streets of Paris

This one's just for fun, but it's actually become a pretty big sport.

Last summer thousands of people came to watch the world's best pilots race around an obstacle track in the Drone Champions League.

Paris's most famous street, the Champs-Elysees, was even closed for the weekend - to make way for the drones.