Last updated at 14:41

Rescue efforts continue in Nepal

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Jenny has an update on Nepal

Rescue work is continuing to find survivors of the latest earthquake to hit Nepal.

The second quake hit Nepal on Tuesday, two weeks after a massive earthquake devastated the country.

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Yogita Limaye reports from Kathmandu

The US Geological Survey said it had a magnitude of 7.3, which is not quite as severe as the first.

Child in NepalReuters
The first earthquake was the biggest in 80 years

It struck in the north of the country, close to Mount Everest, but the tremors were so strong they were felt in nearby India and Bangladesh.

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Yogita Limaye in Baluwa, west of Kathmandu: "I could see dust flying off, stones coming down"

Aid agencies have appealed for funding, saying Tuesday's tremor has badly hit efforts to help those already affected.

Damage

Buildings in Nepal were very badly damaged in the last earthquake, and there are fears that this new quake will have caused further damage.

Rescue helicopters have been sent to the worst affected areas to help those in need.

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We spoke to an earthquake expert to find out if it is normal to have a second earthquake so soon after the first...

BBC reporter Simon Cox was in Nepal when the quake hit.

He told BBC News: "You could feel it really strongly. It went on for about 25 seconds - the ground was shaking, the birds started squawking, you could feel the buildings shaking."

Nepalese run for open space as a strong earthquake hits Kathmandu, Nepal, 12 May 2015.EPA
The quake was followed by a strong aftershock

Jonathan Amos, the BBC's science reporter said: "By any stretch, a magnitude-7.3 quake is a big one."

"It's not quite as big as the quake on 25 April... but it's a major tremor nonetheless."