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How are new UK laws made?

Ayshah visited the Houses of Parliament in London to find out how new laws are made for the UK.
Ayshah met with Baroness D'Souza. She's the speaker of the House of Lords - also known as the Lord Speaker. Part of her job is to keep debates under control in the House of Lords.
Ayshah and Baroness D'Souza
Inside is the House of Commons. The government and its opposition meet here to debate the big political issues of the day.
Ayshah Tull in the House of Commons.
The laws that for the UK begin as a document called a Bill. These are debated on by Members of Parliament.
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These green benches are usually filled with Members of Parliament. There are 650 MPs and they are voted for by the public.
Ayshah Tull and children in the House of Commons
There are around 780 members of the Lords, but that number changes from year to year. Lords are not elected by the public: they are appointed by Queen who takes advice from the Prime Minister.
Children in the House of Lords.
The main job of the House of Lords is to 'double check' new laws suggested by the House of Commons to make sure they are fair and will work.
Ayshah Tull in the House of Lords
The red lines on the floor keep the two sides of the house apart. MPs used to be allowed to carry swords more than 700 years ago, so the lines kept them far enough apart so they couldn't engage in a sword fight!
Red lines on the carpet in the House of Commons
When the House of Commons has agreed on a Bill it is delivered to the House of Lords. Their chamber has bright red chairs which distinguish it from the House of Commons.
The House of Lords
When both the Houses of Commons and House or Lords have agreed on a Bill, the Queen signs it to make it a law.
The Queen
The Houses of Parliament in London is where new rules that everyone in the country has to follow are made.
The Houses of Parliament