Last updated at 08:27
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Picture quiz - Butterflies that bloomed last summer

Farmland butterflies thrived in last year's summer weather, according to a new study. Find out more and test yourself on your butterfly knowledge while you're at it!
Farmland butterflies thrived in last year's glorious summer weather according to a study by the Butterfly Conservation, the British Trust for Ornithology and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. Can you name this green-winged creature?
Brimstone butterfly
This is a red admiral. How well did you do on the quiz. Try again if you couldn't get them right the first time.
red admiral
The research counts butterflies in more than 850 randomly selected one kilometre squares across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. What kind of butterfly is this? Hint - it has 'tortoise' in its name...
tortoiseshell butterfly
But sadly for this butterfly - its numbers were down. Can you name the butterfly in this picture?
red admiral
Warm, sunny conditions allowed butterflies to fly, feed and breed, which meant there were almost double what was recorded in the very wet conditions in 2012. Can you name this little chap?
Large skipper butterfly
This kind of butterfly were the most common and widespread species, recorded in 90% of areas, and there were 8,000 more of these butterflies counted in 2013 than in 2012. But what is it called?
meadow brown butterfly
Did you get it right? this one is a Brimstone butterfly. These kind of butterflies were greater in number and more widespread than last year.
Brimstone butterfly
Experts say the long warm, sunny periods in 2013 helped revive the fortunes of butterflies that had dropped in the poor weather of summer of 2012. What kind of butterfly is this?
common blue
This is a tortoiseshell butterfly. A total of 6,833 small tortoiseshell butterflies were counted, with the species seen in 80% of squares, up from 40% in 2012.
tortoiseshell butterfly
The aim of the study is to assess how butterflies are doing in the wider countryside, where farmland features such as hedgerows and the edges of fields are important habitat for butterflies, rather than at specially-managed sites such as nature reserves. Can you name this butterfly?
small copper butterfly
Did you get it right? It's a small copper butterfly
small copper butterfly
It's a large skipper butterfly.
Large skipper butterfly
This is a meadow brown butterfly - one the most common types.
meadow brown butterfly
And the lovely blue on is called a common blue. It enjoyed a good year in 2013, with a five-fold increase in the average number seen per area on 2012.
common blue