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Pictures: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011

Check out the winning pictures from the Natural History Museum's Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.
These pictures are some of the best images of wildlife from across the planet... and we definitely wouldn't disagree. They're incredible! This group of king penguins were heading back from fishing and up the beach to their colony in South Georgia to feed their young when the photographer Ole Jørgen Liodden snapped this pic.
Ole Jørgen Liodden/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
In this photograph, Klaus Echle has managed to get up close and personal with a fox, to capture it lying completely still on a log. Normally they're scared of people.
Klaus Echle/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
We thought bears liked eating honey, but from the looks of things in this photo they like a good fish supper too.
Paul Souders/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
This is one of a group of about 70 Qinling golden snub-nosed monkeys living high up in China’s Qinling Mountains. The photographer Cyril Ruoso says, "If mother is not around to cuddle up to, then sitting like this is the best way to keep warm in the extreme winter cold."
Cyril Ruoso/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
This photographer, Bence Máté managed to catch the pelican in the front here just as it caught a fish in its pouch. It looks huge because the camera was underneath the pelican but still very close to it. The Veolia Environment Wildlife Photographer of the Year is owned by the Natural History Museum and BBC Wildlife Magazine.
Bence Máté/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
The winners of the competition get their photograph put in a special exhibition at London's Natural History Museum.
Bence Máté/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011
This is the winning photograph by Daniel Beltrá. It's got a serious environmental theme. These pelicans are covered in oil after the massive oil spill off the coast of Louisiana in the US last year. They're going through a clean-up treatment at a temporary bird-rescue facility in Fort Jackson.
Daniel Beltrá/Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011