Last updated at 10:40
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Weather balloon used to take snapshots of Earth

A group of friends have built a weather balloon to try to photograph the curvature of the Earth.
And here it is... The 2,000kg balloon is attached to a camera capsule box that had a high-definition camera and two compact cameras inside to make sure they got photos from different angles.
The team launching their meteorological weather balloon.
The cameras kept snapping away as the balloon soared 22 miles into the air.
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
At one point the team thought they'd lost the balloon, but soon found it using a mobile phone and tracking device they'd installed. And this is just one of the images they captured.
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
The balloon was launched on Sunday from Ross on Wye, Herefordshire, and came down five hours, and 35 miles, later in a tree in a village near Worcester.
First picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
And here's another cloud fact from Chris... The bottom left of this shot shows a bank of stratocumulus, which is the most common low-level cloud in the world!
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
Local weatherman Ian Fergusson says this photo is a great example of "cumulus mediocris" clouds, showing where warm air was rising with showers possible later!
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
Photographer Chris Cardwell and wife Chloe, solar physicist Gareth Dorrian, computer expert Mathew Roberts, photographer Frank Morris and his son couldn't afford to launch a rocket, so they decided to build and adapt their own weather balloon.
The team making their weather balloon.
How would you check out the curve of the Earth without the use of a rocket? That's the challenge this group of friends in Bristol set themselves.
Space enthusiasts, including Chris Cardwell, Gareth Dorrian, Mathew Roberts, and Frank Morris.
Team member Chris Cardwell said it was the first time any of them had tried anything like this, adding: "I did some research into cameras and my wife Chloe, was able to program them to automatically take pictures at pre-determined intervals for the duration of the flight."
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.
The challenge, which was supposed to be a one-off, "worked brilliantly and we are over the moon with the results" according to Mr Cardwell. The Bristol team may now launch the balloon again in the future, this time over the Severn Estuary between Wales and England.
A picture from the meteorological weather balloon's camera.