US & Canada

US Election at a glance: 12 Oct 2010

Day in a Nutshell

Republican strategist Karl Rove defended the party and its allies against White House accusations they had taken money from foreign donors to fund political attacks against Democrats.

With unprecedented levels of cash flooding into Republican-allied coffers - much of it from undisclosed sources - President Barack Obama has taken to warning voters of foreign influence in US elections.

Mr Rove, former White House political adviser to President George Bush, denied the Republican Party was taking foreign money and accused Mr Obama of hypocrisy.

Mr Obama "had no problem at all with this when groups were spending money on his behalf in 2008 and not disclosing donors", Mr Rove said.

Meanwhile, former President Bill Clinton was scheduled to campaign with Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid in Nevada and Vice-President Joe Biden travelled to Iowa to campaign for a Democratic congressional candidate.

Quote - Unquote

"It's got to feel good to get out of the foetal position. You have to try something, right? You can't just talk about the economy," said former Bill Clinton adviser James Carville, egging on Democrats' aggressive new attacks on well-heeled Republican campaign funders.

"It's an archaic system that has never worked," said Republican West Virginia Senate hopeful John Raese, a wealthy businessman and heir, criticising the federal minimum wage of $7.25 (£4.59) per hour.

Key Numbers

With three weeks remaining before Election Day, a new poll shows American voters are firming up their choices in congressional and gubernatorial races. According to a Zogby Interactive survey taken from 8-11 October, the number of undecided voters dropped to 6%, from 10% or higher before.

"The Democratic campaign, led by President Obama, to energize the party base is showing some results," pollster John Zogby wrote. "The [Republican Party] has not yet sealed the deal with voters."

Daily Picture

Image caption Supporters of a proposal to legalise marijuana rally in California, where voters will decide the matter in referendum next month

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