Isle Of Man / Ellan Vannin

Climate change action plan backed by Manx politicians

On-shore wind turbines Image copyright IOM GOV
Image caption Bill Shimmins said the island had been slow in embracing renewable energy

A climate change "action plan" that would see most of the Isle of Man's electricity come from renewable sources has been approved by Tynwald.

Interest will be sought later this year for projects to construct on and offshore wind turbines.

A ban on fossil fuel heating in new homes by 2025 and the planting of a new woodland are included in the plan.

Chief Minister Howard Quayle said it needed to be "a collective commitment" if it was to succeed.

Tynwald voted unanimously to approve the first phase of the government's plans to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

MHK Daphne Caine said she "supported the direction of travel" but the island had been "traa dy liooar" [a Manx expression that means "time enough"] in its efforts.

The plan is based on a report by Professor James Curran, who was appointed chair of the government's climate transformation team in July 2019.

In phase one, the government has committed to getting 75% of the island's electricity from renewable sources by 2035, planting an 85,000-tree woodland, banning peat cutting and developing a network of charging points for electric vehicles.

The Isle of Man Green Party said it was a "positive step" but it fell below what was needed to "engage with the reality of the situation facing the island".

Funding of £10m has been set aside for initial actions, which will include repairing peatland and the creation of more marine nature reserves to promote carbon capture.

A climate change bill is due to be introduced to Tynwald in June 2020 and the second phase of the plan in 2021.

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