Isle Of Man / Ellan Vannin

Isle of Man commits to 75% renewable electricity by 2035

On-shore wind turbines Image copyright IOM GOV
Image caption Expressions of interest for on-shore wind energy generation will be sought this year

Proposals to tackle climate change on the Isle of Man, which include wind energy generation, have been revealed.

The government's "action plan" includes a commitment to produce 75% of the island's electricity from renewable sources by 2035.

Interest from the private sector in projects to construct on and offshore wind turbines will be sought this year.

Chief minister Howard Quayle said the plans needed "buy-in from everyone" on the island.

The proposals are part of a plan to reduce the Isle of Man's carbon emissions to net zero by 2050.

Measures to offset current emissions during the first year of the plan include the repairing of up to 1,000 acres of peatland, the planting of an 85,000-tree woodland, and the creation of more marine nature reserves to promote carbon capture.

A ban on all peat cutting will also be introduced.

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption About £10m will be spent on the first phase of the action plan in 2020-21

Mr Quayle said everyone should take responsibility for their carbon footprint. "Working with the private sector and all of the people of the Isle of Man we can ensure that our children have a future," he added.

A 2019 consultation found that about 80% of respondents would back wind turbines, with 76% in favour even if they were "visible from their home".

Options for tidal and solar power energy generation will also be explored.

It is estimated that meeting the 2050 target will require about £25m of investment by the government per year, matched by funding from the private sector.

At least £10m will be earmarked for the first phase in the 2020-21 Isle of Man budget.

A Climate Change Bill, which would enshrine many of the measures in law, will be brought forward in June.

The action plan is based on a report by Professor James Curran, the independent chair of the government's climate transformation team.

Prof Curran said the plan was a "live document" that would need to be "reviewed on a regular cycle" to keep up with developing technology.

The proposals will be debated by Tynwald this month.

Image copyright IOM GOV
Image caption Plans for a 85,000-tree woodland on land at Meary Veg have already been announced

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