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Garda commissioner defends Donohoe murder investigation

Detective Garda Adrian Donohoe
Image caption To date, no-one has been arrested or charged over the murder of Det Garda Adrian Donohoe

The progress of an investigation into the murder of an Irish police officer has been defended by the force's commissioner.

Det Garda Adrian Donohoe was shot in a robbery at Lordship Credit Union, near Dundalk in County Louth in 2013.

Nóirín O'Sullivan said she accepted the investigation's length had been frustrating but said Irish police could not make mistakes.

To date, no-one has been arrested or charged over Mr Donohoe's murder.

Mrs O'Sullivan said her force was determined to find his killers.

She was speaking at a ceremony in County Tipperary to posthumously award Mr Donohoe with the Scott Medal for bravery, the highest honour for Irish police officers.

Gardaí (Irish police) said he was awarded the medal for his exceptional courage and bravery in giving his own life to protect others.

Mr Donohoe's widow, Caroline, accepted the award on his behalf.

His colleague Joseph Ryan, who was with Mr Donohue when he shot during the robbery, was also awarded the Scott Medal.

Image copyright Pacemaker
Image caption Two days after the murder, the suspected getaway car was found burned out in Northern Ireland

Mr Donohoe, who was married with two children, was the first member of the force to be shot dead while on duty for more than a decade.

The 41-year-old victim was one of two detectives on late-night escort duty at the rural credit union when the robbery took place.

Police said he was shot without warning and did not produce his weapon before he was killed.

The gang stole 4,000 euros (£3,000) in cash before escaping from the scene.

The gang that carried out the shooting is believed to have fled immediately across the border to Northern Ireland.

The suspected getaway car was found two days later, burned out in Fews Forest near Keady, County Armagh.

Police said they had received full co-operation from the PSNI and other forces.

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