Europe

In pictures: Life for migrants in Idomeni refugee camp in Greece

As Turkish and EU leaders gather in Brussels for an emergency summit on tackling Europe's worst refugee crisis since World War Two, the plight of some 13,000 migrants stranded on Greece's border with Macedonia continues to cause concern.

Migrants sleep at a makeshift camp on the Greek-Macedonian border near the village of Idomeni (08 March 2016) Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The sprawling Idomeni refugee camp on the Greek Macedonian border has become the latest flashpoint in the migrant crisis - Macedonia refuses to allow all but a few hundred to cross the frontier every day.
Children and women wait overnight to register at the makeshift camp at the Greek Macedonian borders near the village of Idomeni (07 March 2016) Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption Migrants of all ages are camping in miserable conditions at Idomeni as they wait to cross the border.
A barber shaves a migrant at the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright Visar Kryeziu / AP
Image caption Those camping at Idomeni have to endure numerous hardships including cold weather and poor sanitation in addition to uncertainty about their futures.
Children carry kindling wood at the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright Louisa Gouliamaki / AFP
Image caption The main concern of families is to stay warm as they spend each night in flimsy tents.
Migrants mob a truck bringing donated firewood at the northern Greek border station of Idomeni, ()6 March 2016) Image copyright Vadim Ghirda / AP
Image caption Migrants stranded at Idomeni rely on wood to keep warm...
A child holds firewood Image copyright Louisa Gouliamaki / AFP
Image caption But often there is a woeful shortage of supplies.
Refugees dry clothes on the barbed Image copyright Valdrin Xhemaj / EPA
Image caption The barbed wire fence that marks the border is used as a makeshift washing line.
Medical volunteers carry a woman on a stretcher after she collapsed at the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright Reuters
Image caption The UN and the aid charity Doctors Without Borders (MSF) have warned for several days now that food distribution and sanitation provision are being stretched to breaking point at Idomeni.
Children at the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright LOUISA GOULIAMAKI, AFP
Image caption Aid agencies are particularly concerned about the plight of children at Idomeni - they warn a growing number are suffering from respiratory infections.
A girl plays with a hula hoop in a makeshift camp Image copyright Dimitar Dilkoff / AFP
Image caption And there is little for the children to do apart from wait.
Migrants at the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright Visar Kryeziu, AP
Image caption Greece says that it risks being overwhelmed by the migrant crisis and is appealing for the EU to help out.
Families camp on rail tracks at the Idomeni refugee camp on the Greek-Macedonia border (06 March 2016) Image copyright Dan Kitwood, Getty Images
Image caption There are thousands of multi-coloured and flimsy tents at Idomeni, all clustered together in a farmer's field just outside the village.
A woman and child in the Idomeni camp (07 March 2016) Image copyright Vadim Ghirda, AP
Image caption Refugees prefer to stay at Idomeni rather than other camps set up by the Greek government further away from the border because they believe it will earn them a better place in the queue waiting to cross into Macedonia.
A migrant holds a German flag at the northern Greek border station of Idomeni (06 March 2016) Image copyright Vadim Ghirda, AP
Image caption The ultimate destination for many migrants at Idomeni is Germany - although that country at the moment seems a long way away.

A note on terminology:

The BBC uses the term migrant to refer to all people on the move who have yet to complete the legal process of claiming asylum. This group includes people fleeing war-torn countries such as Syria, who are likely to be granted refugee status, as well as people who are seeking jobs and better lives, who governments are likely to rule are economic migrants.