North Korea's national zoo: Donkeys, dinosaurs and dogs

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Image source, AP
Image caption, Thousands of visitors have flocked to the attraction on the outskirts of Pyongyang, according to the AP news agency.
Image source, AP
Image caption, The Central Zoo was first built in 1959, reportedly by order of Kim Il-sung, the grandfather of present leader Kim Jong-un.
Image source, AP
Image caption, Some may find surprising that one of the zoo's main draws is its Dog Pavilion, which is home to dozens of varieties of dogs, including Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Shih tzus and Saint Bernards.
Image source, AP
Image caption, Kim Jong-un reportedly provided the zoo with its Schnauzers, Poodles, German Shepherds and a Chihuahua, according to a plaque above the dog pavilion.
Image source, AP
Image caption, Signs above the animal habitats state where each "gift animal" came from. Its first was an elephant donated by Ho Chi Minh, the revolutionary leader of Vietnam.
Image source, AP
Image caption, Renovation work at the zoo began in 2014, as part of efforts to modernise the capital. It reopened this July.
Image source, AP
Image caption, More than 40 animal pens have been built for reptiles, monkeys and other wild animals across the zoo to match the surrounding scenery, according to North Korean state news agency KCNA.
Image source, AP
Image caption, In the Lonely Planet guide for North Korea, the Central Zoo had been criticised for keeping animals in "woefully inadequate compounds".
Image source, AP
Image caption, The zoo also houses a Natural History Museum, with displays showing the origins of the solar system and the evolution of life on Earth.

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